Missing Kid: T. Sathiskumar


He is still missing since last August 2012…

T. Sathiskumar went missing after following his grandfather E.P. Veloomurugan, 46, to a food court in Jalan Permatang Pauh here. He was travelling with his father, T. Tamil Vanan, 30, in his lorry until they stopped at the food court at 12.30pm. Tamil Vanan, from Ampang Jajar, Butterworth, was heading towards Bukit Kayu Hitam, Kedah, on his delivery rounds. At the food court, Sathiskumar disappeared in the crowd and could not be found.

State Criminal Investigation Department chief Senior Assistant Commissioner Mazlan Kesah said the boy weighed 15kg and was 70cm tall. He was last seen in a pair of green shorts and a T-shirt with a yellow Spiderman hat. Those with information on Sathiskumar’s whereabouts can call Inspector Mohamed Ehsan Abu Bakar at 012-2494002, or the nearest police station

Please keep an eye for him and parents, please keep close eyes on your kids too and don’t let them be another number in the missing children statistics.

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Flight Delayed


Made a quick trip “down under” last week…

(I must admit, Changi is one well managed airport with plenty of signage to ensure everyone knows where to go – provided you know English. Price of items sold at the airport is at the high side though. But I guess the most unsettling thing at the airport is seeing young girls walking around with sidearms – I am sure they are well trained on firearms and tactics but still, it is very unsettling. Image source: http://alicetravelstory.blogspot.com)

Overall, the journey was good – we made it in time for the business meetings with plenty of hours to spare, the meetings itself went smooth and without any major hiccups and I had one of the best coffees ever at a small stall by the roadside.

We were half way through the meeting when I got a SMS saying that the return flight has been delayed by almost one hour. One hour delay was not that bad but considering that we had expected the meeting to finish early and will have at least couple of hours to spare, adding another one hour was not something we readily welcomed. But we were still grateful for the heads-up.

We decided to kill time by visiting the nearest watering hole and ordered ourselves some beers to lose track of the time. The alcohol did the trick but not the final bill – beers were still cheaper in Malaysia. Halfway through our beers, my colleague posed the question – what if the SMS was wrong and there were no delays and we end up missing our flight. Fearing the worst, we finished our beers and rushed to the airport. It was peak hours – we knew that the MRT would be packed but we managed to find enough space to squeeze through and the MRT journey back was smooth.

We reached the airport early and headed to the counter to check-in. It was confirmed that our flight was delayed by almost one hour. Somehow, that was a blessing in disguise – we had an excellent early dinner and check out the many duty free shops at the airport (although many of the items on sale were overpriced).

The delayed flight was rescheduled to departure at 9.15 pm but by 9.20 pm, we did not see the plane at the departure gate. We wondered if there is going to be another unscheduled delay. At almost 10 pm, the plane finally taxied in and it was almost 10.30 pm when we finally took off – after almost 2 hours delayed.

I do not know what the real cause of the delay was but I suspected it to be the bad weather in Klang Valley – I managed to catch the weather forecast. We were hoping to hear the reason for the delay from the flight attendants but other than “sorry for the delay”, no reasons were given. As we were reaching the runaway, the captain spoke but other than “we are 5th plane on the queue and we will be taking off soon”, nothing was mentioned on the delay either.

I guess for others, the fact that the plane arrived and despite the 2 hours delay, the flight is taking off without further delays would have been good enough but if the airline staff had mentioned the reason for the delay, at least for courtesy sake, it would have been, err nice.

It was already bad that the flight was delayed by an hour and it got worse with the further delays before we can finally depart. At least knowing the reason for the delay would have been some relieve to the immerse frustration and anger on the delay. I mean it would have been happier to say that “my flight was delayed because of thunderstorm” than “my flight was delayed but I don’t know why”.

A couple years ago, as I was sitting in an Emirates flight out from Dubai, there was a delay in departure. We have already boarded the plane but the plane was not moving even after all the passengers had checked in and the flight safety drill has ended. The captain came over on the intercom and apologized for the delay. He said that the ground crew had detected something and making another round of check just to make sure that the plane remains safe. We appreciated the announcement but at the same time, we did not welcome the news that there was something not right with the plane.

But then, I guessed the captain detected the same anxiety and came over the intercom again. This time, he said that there no problem but to ensure of the safety of the crew and the passengers, the airline staff just wanted to make double sure that all systems was working well. This time we breathed slightly better. In the end, we reached our destination several minutes early and without any problems.

Flight delays are understandable but the silence as to why there was a flight delay is not.

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When Government think is the best time to reveal the daily API?


AQI-Chart_20-1wttwsm

(Air Pollution Index – why is is being kept secret when it is crucial in informing the citizen on the actual condition of the air pollution in the country. Image source: http://pdsblogs.org)

There is a lot quarters crying out to the Government for the API reading and the DPM confidently inform that the Government has no plans to release the API reading. Luckily Pak Lah had a better sense of rakyat’s feeling and decided to lift the ban on API reading with immediate effect.

Now the ban is uplifted, Jeff Ooi has a good question on where to check the API readings. So, the upliftment of the ban may still have some teething problems. We are not out of the woods yet.

The question is why keep the readings as a secret in the first place? You can hide the readings but you cannot hide the haze. Assuming Pak Lah did not do the sensible thing, would the Government been agreed to reveal the API reading only after these things happened?

1. A MAS 777 with 350 passenger crashes in KLIA due to poor visibility and the death toll was high (The stewardess was unfortunately had little time to throw down the tray and knell down to pray. It happened too fast).

2. Two large oil tankers collides near Port Klang due to poor visibility and sank causing one of the biggest oil spills to hit Malaysia shores (Indonesia shores was surprisingly spared of this disaster)

3. Thousands of school children in several schools was warded in the hospital for severe breathing problem as their school was unaware the severity of the air pollution (a case of “tak apa” from the school officials and education authorities)

4. 50 cars piled up along Federal Highway near the Istana Negara due to poor visibility (another 20 cars piled up on the other side of the road when some of them slowed down to see the accident)

5. The national productivity drops by almost 50% due to too many people calling in sick or slowed down (count me in into the statistics)

6. Tun Mahathir holds a press conference on the API issue and…(well you all know rest of the story)

Luckily the API reading was revealed before such things happened. In case, you want additional information, you can check visibility observation reports here.