Redefining Enemy of the State


881280-xenophon

(Still remember this ‘enemy of the state’ from Australia. Thanks to the armed intruders in Lahad Datu, Malaysian Government is made a laughing stock when they immediately arrested and deported this ‘enemy of the state’ at the entry point but missed the 200 odd intruders from Sulu and gave 23 days of grace for these intruders to claim a part of Malaysia)

Read these first:-

PKR vice-president Chua Tian Chang has been charged with sedition in a Sessions Court here for making statements linking the Government to the Lahad Datu shootings.

He was charged with making the statements claiming the shootings in Lahad Datu was a planned conspiracy by Umno to divert attention and frighten the people. He also said it was a “drama” by the Government to scare the people and divert their attention in Sabah, particularly away from the RCI into the state’s immigrants issue.

Tian Chua said from the dock: “This is a political allegation. I will answer this defamation to clear my name”.

(Source)

And

In the last stretch before GE13, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad dropped all pretense for a Bangsa Malaysia and has gone for the Malay vote and slammed the Opposition for listening and accommodating the views and needs of the non-Malays.

State news agency Bernama quoted the country’s longest-serving prime minister as saying that Selangor must be saved from the opposition to ensure the rights and position of the Malays and Bumiputras are maintained in the state.

Dr Mahathir said the Pakatan Rakyat (PR) had taken over Selangor’s economy and now had great ambition to control politics in the state.

(Source)

And

Police have busted a Nigerian drug trafficking syndicate, using women’s shoes, to ship drugs. The ‘unique’ modus operandi is the first of its kind, catering to customers overseas but the packing of the drugs is done in Gombak, said Selangor Narcotics chief Asst Comm Nordin Kadir on Thursday.

Three Nigerian men, who are students of private colleges were detained on Tuesday, along with the seizure of more than RM380,000 worth of heroin. The syndicate has been active for six months, gaining entry to the country using student passes.

(Source)

The intrusion in Sabah in one way or another have forced us to relook into how we enforce the security of our national borders and how things have been taken for granted when it comes to foreigners in the country. It is a good thing. We cannot to keep things at status quo if we do not want another armed intrusion at our borders and our security forces suffering unnecessary causalities.

In that sense, let’s look at Tian Chua’s case. He questioned the Government’s inaction against the armed intruders and may have said 1-2 things more about this but it did not take long for a number of police reports to be made against him – some claiming that he belittled the integrity of the armed forces dealing with the intrusion in Sabah. But then again, did he intend to do so? In the initial massive confusion of the whole intrusion, I believe Tian Chua was not alone in questioning the passive action by the Government in dealing with the armed intruder for 23 days before the first shot was fired.

So much so, Mariam Mokhtar writes:-

The rakyat has every right to question our leaders for spending billions of ringgit on armaments, which appear to be overpriced and ineffective. We certainly must question our leaders when it appears that the purchase price includes a heavy commission. A sum of RM1 billion was allegedly paid to the Defence Minister who purchased the Scorpene submarines.

We have a right to criticise our leaders for neglecting the Suluk threat and waiting 23 days before taking action. We condemn our leaders for depriving us of news when family and friends live and work in the area. We condemn Najib’s tactic of locking up opposition politicians who ask questions on our behalf. When we criticise the failure of our leaders to handle the Suluk threat, we are not questioning the bravery of the security forces. A prime minister who resorts to silencing the rakyat with lies and obfuscation, does not deserve our vote.

(Source)

Can you imagine if armed men had rushed into the Petronas Twin Towers, held no hostages and claim that the building belongs to them? Would they be allowed 23 days to evacuate the building? At the most, they would have given a couple of hours before they would have been flushed out one way or another by the police commandos. Same case in Lahad Datu and given the sensitivity of the place, a longer extension of 1-2 days may have been given but certainly not up to 23 days and after final deadlines went unheeded. If you want to find faults with politicians like Tian Chua, he probably is guilty in picking the wrong choice of words and the wrong expression in addressing this concern but certainly not guilty of questioning the integrity of our armed forces. However since he has been charged in the courts, let’s wait for the trial for the final outcome.

And then we have aged politicians like Dr M who claim that a rule under the oppositions means eradication of the rights and privileges of the Malays. Apparently the state of Selangor is in “great danger” due to the accessions to the Non-Malays and must be saved at all cost. This is despite the fact that both the Malays and Non-Malays are Malaysians at the end of the day and the rights and privileges of the Malays are entrenched in the constitution. At this point, one need to wonder what this is so different with the Sulu bandits in Sabah threatening the security of the country? Why there are no barrage of police reports made then? After all, such irresponsible statements (despite coming from a retired old man) are grossly untrue and can cause unnecessary animosity between the various races in the country. Doesn’t a threat to national unity is a threat to the national security? Doesn’t this borders the same Sedition Act that Tian Chua is facing now?

We can understand and tolerate to an extent, the dirty politics and personal attacks on certain individuals or political parties – we had already expected it, from the various instances of Pakatan claiming that BN is corrupt and wasteful with tax-payers money and BN claiming undesirable needs of an Opposition Leader and some opposition politics corrupt as well. If there is proof, we highly welcome it – it will allow us to make an informed decision on who to vote for in the coming general elections. But causing hatred on the basis of Malays are loosing out to the Non-Malays just because BN is not ruling the State should not be tolerated and entertained at all. It should not be allowed to continue as well. Dr M may have done things in the past that gained some respect from Malaysians but at this point of time, he is nowhere at that level. Not when he continues to make statements that only causes disunity between Malaysians.

And whilst we seem to have defined the threat to national security in the wrong way in the past, we seem to be heading at the right direction by looking at the existence of 800,000 Filipinos in Sabah and re-looking at the tightening of the border security. It is a good start but we still have foreigners in this country and some of them determined to be a menace and threatens the good name and the security of the country. We still have Nigerians “students” caught for drug related crimes on a regular basis when we have seen and experienced the same in the past. So why we are still allowing student visas for these Nigerians and how well we did the background check and verifications before we granted them access into this country? We have South Americans doing ATM robbery jobs (I don’t think they have been caught) and Iranians, Indians, Pakistanis and others caught for drug related crimes.

We have a sizeable number of foreigners in this country and we need them for the growth of the nation. We appreciate their hard work, investment and participation but at the same time, the Government should be very mindful on who comes in and out of the country. The Lahad Datu armed intrusion could just be a rare incident and we may not see any further escalation once the on-going clean-up by our security forces ends but then again, it also happened because we took things for granted and swept the issue of foreigners in Sabah under the carpet for far too long. Malaysia is a peaceful country but we should not sit on our laurels – we need to be mindful on who are the real enemy of the state.

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1Malaysia Deepavali?


This year, I “celebrated” my Deepavali overseas again due to work assignment – I am kind of getting used it (that is worrying).

(Still the best Deepavali ad ever! It was funny, direct to the point and made us think for a second on the meaning of Deepavali)

An interesting letter on this year’s Deepavali’s ads:-

The TV advertisement of 1Malaysia promotion by Finas in RTM/TV3/Astro during Deepavali this year is inundated with encouraging religious conversion of Hindus to Islam. It shows how a Hindu youth married to Muslim girl can still celebrate Deepavali with his parents.

The boy’s family is initially hostile to his Muslim conversion but accepts him after the birth of his children. Anyone who marries a Muslim in Malaysia must convert to Islam and this fact is hidden in this advertisement. This deliberately hiding of facts is mischievous and misleading to the Hindu viewers.

It leads the viewers into the belief that religious conversion may be hostile in the beginning but will be accepted upon the birth of children into the family. Finas is silently misleading Hindu youths into religious conversion as part of the 1Malaysia campaign.

The girl who is married to this convert refuses to eat food cooked by Hindu family until she is assured that the food is cooked by another Muslim. This episode only depicts that the Hindus are inferior to Muslims that they can’t eat food cooked by Hindus… not halal I suppose.

(Source)

I did not have the chance of seeing Deepavali ads over our local TV until I saw one from Finas that shows the above mentioned ad on the night I came back to Malaysia.

At first I thought Finas was doing a fast “Yasmin Ahmad” like ad (we miss her a lot) but in the end, I did not understand the message that the ad was trying to portray. Perhaps to show that the neighbour is kind enough to come to the rescue by making “halal” breakfast for the Indian family on Deepavali first morning? Perhaps it is a message of understanding and forgiveness – after all, the family is “reunited” after the birth of the first grandchildren? Perhaps it is a new concept of movie making in 1Malaysia and that is why I am a bit lost on this (perhaps it was the jet-lag too).

Seriously whilst I am all out for Bangsa Malaysia and don’t mind on the issue of a convert wanting to be with the family for Deepavali (ya, forget that the conversion issue is in a big mess in Malaysia but seriously, in the ad, it was touching), the ad could be done with better storyline .

Why show that the girl refuses to eat until it was assured that it was not cooked by the in-laws? What happen to the concept of open house in Malaysia? What happened to trusting each other? No one brought their own food to open house before. Instead of being an ad with a good message, it ended up as being an insensitive, message between the lines ad.

I just wonder, don’t we have any better story for Deepavali ads? Or whatever talent we had, died with the demise of the late Yassim Ahmad?

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Making of a Bangsa Malaysia


(Bangsa Malaysia also means a nation of people who speak in one voice. Image source: Mob’s Crib)

Whilst we are so against racism in Malaysia, obviously we are not angels ourselves…

OutSyed the Box rightfully nailed the point with this:-

The time has also come where we must seriously consider merging the school system into just one school system i.e. based on Bahasa Malaysia and English only. We need to abolish the Chinese and Tamil language school system. The Chinese and Tamil language heroes say that if Chinese and Tamil schools are abolished, their language and culture will also disappear. Wrong.

There are 1.5 billion Chinese in China who will make sure that the Chinese language, culture and the Chinese people will never disappear from the face of the earth. The same argument applies for the 1.0 billion Indians in India. This however is Malaysia. It is not and cannot be China or India.

When Chinese, Indians and anyone else migrate to Australia they learn to speak English in a jiffy. No one asks for Tamil or Mandarin to be made national languages in Australia. No one sings the Waltzing Matilda in Tamil or Mandarin in Australia.

The same logic applies to Malaysia. It is high time non Malays in Malaysia learn to speak Malay like a native Malay. Getting straight As for Bahasa Malaysia in the SPM does not mean anything if you still say ‘saya api kereta naik mari’ or ‘saya naik keleta api mali sini.”

It is not cute anymore. Actually it is quite embarrassing. Please lets speak the language the way it should be spoken.

Let put aside the fact that most of us get very nervous in police stations and even well prepared linguistic experts may fumble with Bahasa when confronted with stern looking policeman and after becoming a victim of a crime (in this case a snatch thief victim). Let’s look at the mastery of language by ordinary Malaysians – Malays and non Malays alike.

This is something I too pondered on in my post titled “Bangsa Malaysia, Bahasa Malaysia”:-

That’s right – how many of us can speak the national language rather fluently? If we can’t speak with one voice, how then we are expected to be living united as one Bangsa Malaysia? I have high regards to the national language which itself is a strong fusion of many languages – Sanskrit, Mandarin, English and more.

After 53 years of gaining independence, if we are unable to speak the national language, Bahasa Malaysia and the globally wide used language, English fluently – we can’t do anything but to put down our head down and walk away ashamed.

It is an irony that whilst many of us talk about creating a Malaysian Malaysia, we are not willing to speak in one language. It is not harm preserving our forefather’s language but it should not be at the expense of Bahasa Malaysia and English. My grandma who is in her late 80’s speaks fluent Bahasa Malaysia and over the years, picked up English (courtesy of her great grandchildren who speak English and not Tamil as the main language in the house).

To the credit of the non Malays, things are also changing (thanks to education and closer interaction with other Malaysians). A long time ago, we used to use words like “gua” (me) and “lu” (you) whenever we speak Bahasa Malaysia but things have changed. We use the proper “saya” and “awak” these days. How fluent we are in speaking and writing a particular language is all depends on the environment that we are. We are all in Malaysia and on daily basis, we have to speak, read and write in Bahasa Malaysia one way or another, so to say that we did not have the chance to learn is a wasteful excuse. The same goes for learning other main languages – English.

I started schooling in national school – so at a very young age, I was fortunate to be exposed to both Bahasa Malaysia and English (still recall how our Standard 1 teacher, the very strict Mrs. Bala used to get us to shout the basic pronunciations in Bahasa at our very top of our voice). The use of Tamil language was more confined to home, which explains on why I am quite weak in writing and reading Tamil (my parents put more focus on Bahasa and English as well). And when I had no place in the local university and had to study in private college, I had to go full force on mastering English – it was THE language of Law.

And when I started work, I was in an environment where Bahasa Malaysia was the primary spoken and written language. I forced myself to improve on my Bahasa Malaysia (Bahasa in a working environment is more fluid, less “royal” than the Bahasa that I used when I was a member of school debate team) – I seriously wanted to make a lasting impression on my superiors and subordinates. These days, it is a mix of the two. Opportunities to learn languages come in many forms – work environment, friends, studies, etc. It is up to us to grab the opportunity and learn up the main 2 languages in the country.

So, if you, after 53 years of independence and having plenty of opportunities to learn up on Bahasa Malaysia and English still say “saya naik keleta api mali”, shame on you for not taking the trouble to master the two main languages in this country. As Malaysians, the right way to get the future generation to master both languages is to make away with Chinese and (struggling) Tamil schools and proceed with one school structure that will not only improve the mastery of language and quality of education but also foster greater unity among young Malaysians.

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Slaying the Real Bogeyman


(Who is the real bogeyman in Malaysia? Some people determined to prove that it is none other than fellow Malaysians. Image source: http://img1.fantasticfiction.co.uk)

53rd anniversary of our independence is just around the corner, and yet we continue to read these nonsense – we should be ashamed of ourselves.

Read this first:-

In response, Tee said that the country does not want Ang’s children, whether legal or illegitimate, a favourite line he continually implies about the Chinese.

“She does not need to send her ‘children’ (if any were legitimate) to national school, if she is not confident with the national school or she is scared that her ‘children’ will become Malays. Her ‘children’ are not needed here.

“Just send her ‘children’ to schools in her homeland or overseas. The presence of ‘children’ are not needed here,” he said in a personal attack on Ang, who has also had two police reports lodged against her over her article.

(Source)

In response to that article, Aizuddin Danian said this:-

People like Helen Ang have proven themselves capable of critical thought. She’s taken an issue, examined the facts, and presented her argument in favour of her case. Instead of engaging her in discussion (Heaven forbid, she might have a valid point, who knows?), she becomes the subject of ad hominem attacks, and rudely invited to leave the country.

The worse thing for Malaysia is for her, and people like her (people capable of analyzing a problem and presenting a rational case), to take up the Lambs’ offer and leave. Just like any one of the 3 million Malaysians or ex-Malaysians who make their living away from the Motherland.

These are people who are able to compete at a global scale, world class human beings so to speak. Isn’t it a shame that many prefer not to ply their trade in our shores? Can we blame them for choosing greener pastures, or do we blame Lamb’s like Dr Mohd Ridhuan for driving them away by denying them the greens of our own garden and forcing them to make do with a diet of rocks and stones?

Somewhere else, we read this:-

Malay rights group Perkasa has urged the government to review the proposal to carry out open tender for the sale of strategic land, saying the move could erode “the little remaining assets owned the Malays and Bumiputera.”

(Source)

That call was objected with this:-

Open tenders by the government for the sale of strategic land would not erode Malay interests, says Kedah Gerakan Youth

(Source)

In every “race” in Malaysia for many years now, we have been fed with an invisible bogeyman from time to time by greedy, twisted politicians and agenda filled race based NGOs.

The Malays for example have always been told that the non-Malays in particular the Chinese is out to get them, out to strip them of their “rightful” rights and powers (even more so after the opposition had a major win in the last general election). The non Malays on the other hand have been told that implementation of Islamic way of life, will erode their beliefs and cultural values. So, that is what we been told explicitly and impliedly, over many form of media.

And for those who had never ventured out from the country, the only “foreigners” they see on daily basis are Malaysians from different cultural and racial background and with the constant lies by the politicians and NGOs; fear for fellow Malaysians is created.

To create further uneasiness, fellow Malaysians are also been labeled as “pendatang” (immigrants or squatters) by, ironically, the very people whom ancestors were immigrants themselves.

Khir Toyo’s father for example was from Indonesia, Ahmad Sabri’s grandparents were from India and the Mohd Ridhuan who rudely asked Helen Ang to send her “illegitimate” kids to her “homeland” – his ancestors were from China. At end of the day, we are all “pendatang” but you make yourself looking like an idiot when you start calling others “pendatang” but failed to recognize that you are a “pendatang” too.

They don’t realize how small we are when we are against the global community and only by being strongly united we can bring up this country at par with the developed countries. It is not the time to create fear and uneasiness among fellow Malaysians and foreign investors as whole – not when we are seeing the Foreign Direct Investments figures plunging down in recent months.

Instead of “conveniently” putting the blame on fellow Malaysians for all the shortcomings, self weaknesses and as a mean of unity the community against the oppositions, let’s focus on slaying the REAL bogeyman, shall we?

Implementation of NEP, NEM, Affirmative Policies

Some NGO says that Malay rights will be eroded with the removal of NEP but everyone knows that whilst the spirit of NEP is highly commendable, the implementation of the NEP has not been one. The PM’s banker brother even goes on to say that the NEP has been “bastardised”:-

The New Economic Policy (NEP) is “bastardised” as it deviated from its goal of poverty eradication, CIMB group chief executive officer Datuk Seri Nazir Razak said.

He said the NEP, formulated by second prime minister Tun Abdul Razak Hussein, had come a longway from a social engineering experience, which was aimed at uplifting the livelihood of the people, especially Bumiputeras.

“But now, it (NEP) is so embedded in everything we do, in every part of government and businesses that it has become a problem. And every time I mention the NEP, I get blasted.”

(Source)

Many in the Government do realise the weaknesses in the implementation of policies such as NEP (now re-coated as NEM) but when it is raised, it is faced with objections. Often the question on the weaknesses of the implementation (and not the policy itself) is often met with claims that it is questioning the Malay rights. At the end of the day, the weakness in implementation remains unresolved and is left to be abused further.

Tony Pua of PR recently suggested the removal of Bumiputera discounts for properties more than RM500,000 and rechannel that money for Malays who did not have enough money to buy properties. His suggestion – instead of reviewed positively (to redistribute wealth from the rich to the poor), was taken as questioning the Malay rights. Tony Pua at the end got a death threat and bullets in his mail.

Mismanagement of public funds

Wastage of tax-payers money by expensive and wasteful projects is nothing new in Malaysia. The Malays forms about 60% of Malaysians on whole. So, if the Government can be more prudent with its spending, curtail unnecessary wastages and channel the available funds for development where the people will benefit to the maximum, who is benefit the most? Mismanagement of public funds is one bogeyman that these racial politicians and NGOs should focus on.

And with mismanagement of funds, we all know, corruption usually tags along.

MACC have started to work its way to nab the bigger fish but it is has a long way to go before it can gain the public trust and respect. Sarawak Report has been uncovering pretty interesting revelation on a certain Chief Minister and his family’s wealth. Based on the allegations (backed with documents and facts), there seems to be a clear case of mismanagement of funds, abuse of powers and no proper distribution of wealth from the state to the people. But then again, this could be just the tip of the iceberg. Corruption is another bogeyman that has been let on loose for a very long time now.

Quality of life

Malaysia is not far off in terms of quality of education but how far we are off from creating quality graduates? Students are not allowed to participate in politics and those who go against the establishment are often punished. How many of the graduates is allowed to think rationally and out-of-the box? How many of them is well equipped to meet the challenges of today and excel in any fields they are in?

We already dismissed the English language in favor of the national language but for the wrong reasons. Can we maintain the quality? So, instead creating fear among Malaysians, why can’t these politicians and NGOs fight for better schools and quality graduates?

There has been a call to review and revise the minimum salary for Malaysians and whilst cost of living have gone up (what more with the removal government subsidies on key consumer items), it has been unfortunate that the general level of disposal income of Malaysians have not gone up accordingly. At the end of the day, Malaysians find that it is getting more difficult to bridge the expense – income gap. So, instead creating fear among Malaysians, why can’t these politicians and NGOs fight for better wages? Better wages means better business environment – are we in the right position for that? Fear against fellow Malaysians is not the right factor to create ideal business environment.

The above is just a handful of issues that the politicians and NGOs can spend time for the betterment of the community instead of wasting time hunting for a bogeyman that is not – fellow Malaysians. It is better for Malaysia and for the community. Let’s slay the real bogeyman instead of wasting time creating disunity among fellow Malaysians. Not when we are turning 53 years old.

I once watched a movie where a man is seen heading the shouting at a political rally. He looked so emotional and nothing seemed to stop him from making a point. When a friend asked him why he is participating in this rally, he said he did not know. He heard people shouting and decided to join in.

Similarly, let do the fighting where it is needed the most – real issues that affects all Malaysians. Let’s not make a fool of ourselves by creating an issue that distracts the rest from the real issues and get overworked with it.  Let’s not shout for the sake of shouting. After 53 years, we certainly can do better than this.

Saya Anak Bangsa


(KJ may have said things that are against the concept Saya Anak Malaysia in the past but hopefully he had realised that embarking on Saya Anak Malaysia would be the right way for country. Image source: Saya Anak Malaysia)

An interesting conversation that took place on 1Malaysia:-

The biggest laughter came with the final question from Khairy, who asked half-farcically: “Now, tell me, is 1Malaysia the best thing that ever happened since Merdeka?”

Chin Huat: “Well, I generally don’t trust politicians. For me, the public needs to view them like pets. You have to train them or they will go wild on you. It’s just like having a dog, you know. Put it through a training regime, then it will serve you well.” (Ouch… the man can bite!)

Haris: “Where’s the sincerity? You say 1Malaysia, but the nation is still divided into bumiputra and non-bumiputra.”

Khairy: “But Haris, aren’t you a bumiputra yourself?”

Haris: “I’m not a bumiputra. I’m an Anak Bangsa Malaysia.”

(Source: Saya Anak Malaysia)

Saya Anak Malaysia was founded on this notion that all of us are first and foremost Malaysians and Malaysia is our Home. “One People, One Nation” is what we need to achieve at the end of the day. 1Malaysia maybe another but before we can embark on that journey, we need to recognise that we all are in the first place Anak Malaysia.

Perfect Reply to…


Yet another mis-guided post from the so-called brilliant Malaysian – plenty of arguments here and there but at the end of the day, does nothing to unite Malaysians.

(We may be different but at end of the day, we are all Malaysians. Image source: http://www.ctl.utm.my)

The good thing however is that many Malaysians is not taking that piece crap (the majority rule formula) sitting down and doing nothing. This has to be one of the hardest reply on the so-called social contract and politicians’ hidden hands of colliding Malaysians against each other, all in the sake of keeping their powers:-

This nation is built, from day one, by one strength and that strength is the unity of her people, regardless of race or religion. There is no such thing as this is “our” nation and not “theirs”.

In fact, may I respectfully point out that you, as a Chinese Muslim, are contradicting yourself when you refer to this land as “our own land” if what you meant by “our own land” is that this land is the land of the Malays. Please dear Doctor. Be more sensitive to the feelings of all Malaysians. You are after all an influential ustaz or teacher whose views are respected by many.

(From Art Harun)

Read further here (it is very inspiring)

I have to agree with Art Harun that at the end of the day, we are in this together – we may have our own problems, standards and even political stand but we should not sacrifice our country’s interest for our personal ones. Why can’t we just confront the sticky issues that have been nagging us for some time now and try to resolve it and move on much pressing issues (such as economy).

Why the “you” and “me” stand here? Bangsa Malaysia is much better than any crappy politicians or anyone with hidden agenda – any given time of the day. So, can we focus on our similarities rather than on our differences and get ourselves out from the racial cave and get Malaysia back on her feet?

1Racist in 1Malaysia


(Image source: Hannah Yeoh’s Blog)

Interesting story over theSun titled “A bond which is colour blind” which was a reprint of Pakatan Rakyat’s Hannah Yeoh post titled “Real 1Malaysia”.

But the thing that I wanted to point out is this (from Hannah Yeoh’s blog):-

That encounter had a lasting impression on me. When I came home, I shared this experience with my husband.

Ram as he usually would, said something profound to me, “Do you know why they have such a strong friendship?”

“Why?”, I asked.

“It is because they focus on their similarity, they share in their disability”.

Ram can’t be any more true. Discrimination happens when we magnify our differences. Race-based politics is all about highlighting our differences. Instead of celebrating our similarities as Malaysians, we discriminate and highlight our neighbour’s weaknesses and boast of our own strength. We falsely imagine that we could survive without others.

Now compare that with this latest, twisted posting:-

Bagi saya tiada salahnya kerajaan membantu orang Melayu dan bumiputera kerana itu telah diperuntukkan dalam Perlembagaan. Perlembagaan pula bukanlah dicipta dan dibentuk sesuka hati tetapi melalui satu proses yang mengambil kira sejarah dan kepentingan kaum pribumi tanpa menafikan hak kaum imigran (saya menggunakan perkataan imigran kerana perkataan pendatang sudah dianggap perkauman oleh sesetengah orang).

(Loosely translated: For me, there is nothing wrong for the government to help the Malays and the natives (note: natives – does it includes Orang Asli? Because Orang Asli’s rights are being screwed upside down for many years now) because it is have allocated for in the Constitution.

The Constitution was not created and shaped to one’s whims and fancy but has gone through a process which takes into account the history (note: which version?) and the rights of the natives (note: does it includes the immigrants from the island of Java?) without denying the right of the immigrants (note: what is the big difference between immigrants from Java and immigrants from India or China? And what category of those “non natives” who born in Malaysia by several generations will fall into?)

(I use the word immigrant because the word “pendatang” (note: in English it also means immigrant” ) already deemed racial in nature by some people)

Why the cruel division of Malaysians into Malays, Natives and Immigrants? Why harp on the so-called differences?

At end of the day, all Malaysians, regardless of skin colour, culture and religion have one thing in common – the well being of the country and it’s people. The last thing we want to see is the country in ruin, natural resources abused, public funds plundered and plenty of disunity & distrusts among the people.

Let’s focus on our similarities rather on the differences – let’s not follow the politicians who have nothing to do but to harp on our differences for political mileage.

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