NVIDIA’s Tegra K1


nvidia-car-tegra-k1

(So much computing in just one car – well, it is not a dream anymore. The focus must be on technology and know-how and not an in-fight on who owes the name of God and everyone getting so tense on issues that will not elevate the nation with the rest of the developed countries. Image source: http://phandroid.com)

The world is certainly moving on a pace that we have not seen in the past as evidenced by this Wall Street Journal report:-

NVIDIA‘s new Tegra(R) K1 mobile processor will help self-driving cars advance from the realm of research into the mass market with its automotive-grade version of the same GPU that powers the world’s 10 most energy-efficient supercomputers.

Tegra K1 features a quad-core CPU and a 192-core GPU using the NVIDIA Kepler(TM) architecture, the basis for NVIDIA’s range of powerful GPUs — including the processors that are used in the top 10 systems featured in the latest Green500 list of the world’s most energy-efficient supercomputers.

Tegra K1 will drive camera-based, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) — such as pedestrian detection, blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure warning and street sign recognition — and can also monitor driver alertness via a dashboard-mounted camera.

“To process the steady deluge of sensor and camera data required by a self-driving car, NVIDIA is bringing highly energy-efficient supercomputer technology inside the vehicle,” said Taner Ozcelik, vice president and general manager of the Automotive business at NVIDIA. “Tegra K1 solves this by providing 10 times the computing power of previous mobile processors without consuming additional energy.”

The Tegra K1 is also the first mobile processor to support CUDA(R) — the parallel computing platform at the heart of modern computer vision. In its automotive-grade form, this super chip is hardened to withstand a wider range of temperatures and withstand harsher operating conditions.

In addition to computer vision, the Tegra K1 processor excels at creating razor-sharp, photo-real 3D graphics. Using NVIDIA’s Material Definition Language — which simulates how light reflects and refracts off of actual materials — digital instrument clusters and infotainment systems can be customized with a wide range of virtual materials, from copper, titanium and brushed aluminum, to stitched leather and carbon fiber.

Libraries of photo-realistic rendered material provide a nearly limitless range of customizable digital cockpit configurations. These allow drivers to configure their gauges, controls and dials to suit their unique tastes.

(Source)

No doubt, as many past milestones in the computing world, it will be only matter of time before even this too would be surpassed by even more powerful and intelligent processes. And in the meantime, right here in Malaysia, we have this still lurking on the front pages:-

Datin Paduka Marina Mahathir will not be dragged into a fight with Malay rights group Perkasa, who had accused her of seeking cheap publicity by supporting the Christians in the Allah controversy. Marina, who is the daughter of Perkasa patron Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, had refused to comment when she was asked about Perkasa’s criticisms against her. “I don’t want to comment about Perkasa. They talk so much rubbish,” she said after attending the first National Unity Consultative Council meeting in Kuala Lumpur today.

(Source)

Whilst we have been looking at the wrong issues when the world is flying on a totally different orbit, not all is lost with citizens like Datin Paduka Marina Mahathir (who’s father is the patron of Perkasa) coming out and say that some people in this country talk so much rubbish. That is correct indeed – something that was further reinforced by this and unfortunately we still have a bit more way to go before we can gain back our sanity on what is more crucial for the nation.

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Bersih 2.0: Where is Wally?


Or should it be where is Ibrahim Ali – the clown who talked a lot?

(At times, it seems OK to have people who talked about and threaten others – they hardly make the impact but it is not acceptable when the same idiot is a Member of Parliament and make seditious statements but remains free from arrests and prosecutions. Image source: http://peoplepowerportal.blogspot.com)

The rally that saw a very united Malaysians of all ages and backgound has come and gone but the aftermath of it has been bad news for the Government. If only Najib had granted Bersih 2.0 the use of Stadium Merdeka or had the police dictated the meeting point of the rally and escorted them to deliver the demands peacefully, things would have been less ugly.

Plenty may been said of Bersih 2.0’s rally, the clash between the police who deployed the same high handed tactics, it’s key leaders arrested when they showed up as promised and some injured in the process (tragically one had died) but for me, what UMNO Youth did tops the rest and earned my respect (although they could have merged with Bersih 2.0 on common grounds).

I have to salute UMNO Youth headed by Khairy who at least showed up despite threat of arrest on sight. They were small in numbers and hardly made a dent on Bersih 2.0 but at least they kept their words – they showed up, refrained themselves from any clashes with Bersih 2.0 and promptly were arrested after a short stand-off with the police.

This is unlike the other guy who talked a lot, foams forming at side of the mouth before the rally (to an extent telling the Chinese Malaysians to stock up food) and now proven to be the one without BALLS – Ibrahim Ali of Perkasa refused to show up at the city with his members (citing highly predicated but lame excuses).

One just hope that this show of cowardliness when the time for reckoning had come, will silence him from opening his foul mouth in future or we shall pray he to suffer another heart attack from serious embarrassment. The world would be a better place from this guy who been threatening and accusing Malaysians and does nothing concrete in the process of nation building and national unity.

The night before Bersih 2.0 rally saw mother of all traffic jams, something that many have to point the finger on the Government and the police. Despite the fortification (yes, that is was used on the tactics deployed) of KL, Bersih 2.0 rally still saw thousands on the street, peacefully rallying as promised.

The busy junction in front of the Puduraya bus terminal became the focal point of yesterday’s protest as crowds snowballed from 500 in nearby Petaling Street at 12.40pm to a whopping 10,000 just half an hour later.

And while the protesters faced off with the police at Jalan Pudu, just round the corner, mere metres away an estimated thousand more were turned away from the original planned gathering point Stadium Merdeka, which was barricaded by police with barbed wire.

But with so many obstacles in place and the entire city practically locked down with roadblocks and closure of key LRT stations, how did the protesters give the police the slip and organised themselves?

(Source Malaysiakini)

Hopefully the police will drop the idea of putting roadblocks to stop ordinary Malaysians from attending peaceful rallies in the future and instead, provide proper escort and guidelines to ensure that rallies are done in proper, safe, peaceful manners. Roadblocks are useless, it is not effective to prevent rally from taking place and all it does very effectively is to create unnecessary tension against the police & the Government and waste time and fuel.

And the bugger who talked a lot but went missing on rally day, one can hope that he has been humbled by events of Bersih 2.0 namely the attendance of UMNO Youth under Khairy.

Well done Bersih 2.0 & Khairy.

Bersih 2.0 – The King’s Response


Finally, some light at the end of the tunnel…

(The King who presided over the previous Bersih 1.0 is once again have made declaration that should bring the Government and Bersih 2.0 on talking terms again – hopefully. Image source: http://pinkturtle2.wordpress.com)

Well, it could have been an indirect warning to Bersih 2.0 or it could have been the lifeline that Najib been looking for to bring the tug-of-war between the Government and Bersih 2.0 to a friendlier conclusion but still, it is an interesting and timely statement from the King.

From theSun:-

“I am following closely the developments of the proposed gathering and procession by Bersih with the aim of handing over a memorandum to me as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, and how the government, particularly the agencies and departments concerned, is handling the issue.

“However, I believe that the nation’s leadership under Yang Amat Berhormat Datuk Sri Mohd Najib Tun Haji Abdul Razak is capable of handling this problem in the best possible way.

“I urge that amid the political fervour of a section of the people to bolster democracy in our country, it must also be ensured that this demand on democracy does not bring destruction to the country.

“Generally, we cannot be following too much the practices in other countries, as harmony and stability are vital foundations for a country and which all quarters must protect.

“I also urge the government to carry out everything that is entrusted to it by the people in a just and wise manner, and it is important that I as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong do not want to see this country with a plural society in a situation where there is animosity among them or a section of the people being enemies with the government, on whatever grounds.

“When any problem arises, we as a civilised society must resolve it through consultations and not follow our emotions, as the Malay saying goes, Yang Dikejar Tak Dapat Yang Dikendong Berciciran (Not getting what we chase after and spilling what we carry).

“The fact is, street demonstrations bring more bad than good although the original intention is good. Instead, we should focus on our main objective to develop this country, and not create problems that will cause the country to lag behind.

“Remember that there is no land where the rain does not fall, there is no ocean that is not turbulent. That is how important moderation and compromise is, which has been long been in practice by our nation’s administration.”

Yes, it is a translated text (read here for the BM version) but there are wise messages for both side of the divide from the King and if one read between the lines (rather widely, of course), is the King telling the Government that they are not handling the situation wisely?

Consider these statements:-

“…Najib Tun Haji Abdul Razak is capable of handling this problem…”

The King says Najib is capable of, he did not say Najib IS handling the best possible way. As at todate, instead of engaging Bersih 2.0 in a more matured ways, the Government unfortunately has only acted irrational and with a pinch of paranoia from labeling the organizers as trouble makers, banning yellow Bersih T-shirts under an unnamed law, arresting groups of protestors under unimaginative charges, to stopping pre Bersih 2.0 rallies.

“….a section of the people being enemies with the government…”

Instead using the label “trouble makers” for the organizers of Bersih 2.0, the King calls them “a section of the people” which is true and admirable because Bersih 2.0 at the end of the day is nothing but ordinary citizens who have certain demands for the Government. And when the ordinary citizens are deemed to be enemies of the Government, it is actually reflecting badly on the Government, not the people. This is because Government is elected by the people and once you fall out with the people, it could mean the end of you in the next elections.

No doubt, there were messages for Bersih 2.0 as well – to continue with direct engagements with the relevant stakeholders instead of doing it through street rallies and demonstrations. And there seems to be some positive development towards that both from Bersih 2.0 and the Government (they seems to agree on rally to be held in a stadium now) but do expect massive traffic jam during the weekend especially towards the city centre.

The ball is in the Government’s court now – demands of Bersih 2.0 only calls for betterment of the election process (minus the call for street rally perhaps). We would not have even gotten to Bersih 1.0 if the whole election process has been well managed and fair from the very start but the truth of the matter is that it is not – one must admit that loopholes still exists and even the EC has admitted that there is “only so much” they could do although many may disagree with this – certainly “cleaning the electoral roll, reforming postal balloting, use of indelible ink, and minimum 21 days campaigning period is well within the ambit and ability of the EC.

P.s. In the meantime, it seems that Ibrahim Ali is now so upset because the King is willing to see the organizers of Bersih 2.0 and not him. His quote of the day – “We at Perkasa have written many times to meet with the King on several issues but we’ve never gotten that” was timely responded by one of reader with this statement “Ibrahim Ali? Perkasa? I am not surprised with Istana Negara’s decision”. Now that is funny!

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Putting it in Perspective

Bersih 2.0


Imagine reading this news on 10th July 2011 morning:-

I have been busy with an assignment lately and I have been traveling too but as much as possible, I do try to keep abreast with the latest news at home. And one that has been quite hot in the news recently is the Bersih 2.0 rally on 9th July 2011.

It is amazing that 500 – 600 police reports have been lodged against Bersih 2.0 todate and it has gotten Perkasa and UMNO Youth into the act as well although their objectives may differ from what Bersih 2.0 is standing for.

No doubt, public rallies in Malaysia have always been chaotic and not in all circumstance, we can say that the blame needs to be put on the shoulders of the organizers. As Ibrahim Ali of Perkasa had said it will be chaos and we agree to that but it only get even more chaotic when there are opposing parties striven to throw the spanner into the woodworks. Still remember the rallies by Anti ISA organizers and the Pro ISA organizers that happen on the same time. The Pro ISA rally was cocked up only after the Anti ISA rally was announced.

And whenever we have public rallies, there is this famed “mother of roadblocks” by the police which does nothing to prevent the public rally from happening but gets into the nerve of every motorist that have to pass through these insane traffic jams that is created by these road blocks. It is more productive for these policemen to doing real policing work rather stand around by the side of the highway, manning road blocks which cause 3 lanes of traffic to be squeezed into 1 and as no ones passes these road blocks wears a large “I am Public Rally participant” signboard, the effectiveness of such road blocks is highly questionable. Bersih 2.0 organizer did not get the permit for the public rally but so did Perkasa – so it will be interesting to see how police will act against the two.

And why we should oppose this rally which calls for fair election practices? Doesn’t it promote the very principles of democracy? There are still loopholes in the way we conduct our elections although the Election Commission and the Government will think otherwise. Postal votes for example remains a pain in the neck for the oppositions and it is no secret that gerrymandering is practiced wide spread by those who intend to keep themselves in power. Yes, our election process has not reached the level of maturity that we have hoped it to be.

Bersih 1.0 was unprecedented and was a great success and a couple of weeks later, the Government had another headache dealing with Hindraf rally. Both rallies, coupled with high handed tactics by the previous Government helped to steer the nation to hand over the worst election result to BN and helped the opposition to gain control of 4 states. We have seen the progress made by the oppositions since 2008 – some is good, some is bad.

Having thousands of people on the streets will not only be a logistic nightmare for the organizers but also for the law enforcement agencies. Can they keep peace and order? The easy way out for the police would be to deny the permit for the rally in the place, mitigating the expected chaos if the rally goes through. And that is what the police had done too but certainly it is not going to stop the rally. And what about the inconvenience that it creates for those who is not involved in the rally but had to drive in to the city for urgent matters. Think of the traffic jams and disruptions to the daily routine for the day. And we have yet to count the expected losses by businesses that had to close their premises for the day in fear of riots and public disorder.

Thus arriving to the question that many may be asking – whether we still need a Bersih 2.0? To answer that question, we probably need to see what Bersih 2.0 is demanding.

Bersih 2.0’s 8 demands are not surprisingly something new – it is something we have been hearing from NGOs and the oppositions all over the years.

1. Clean the electoral roll
The electoral roll is marred with irregularities such as deceased persons and multiple persons registered under a single address or non-existent addresses. The electoral roll must be revised and updated to wipe out these ‘phantom voters’. The rakyat have a right to an electoral roll that is an accurate reflection of the voting population.

In the longer term, BERSIH 2.0 also calls for the EC to implement an automated voter registration system upon eligibility to reduce irregularities.

2. Reform postal ballot
The current postal ballot system must be reformed to ensure that all citizens of Malaysia are able to exercise their right to vote. Postal ballot should not only be open for all Malaysian citizens living abroad, but also for those within the country who cannot be physically present in their voting constituency on polling day. Police, military and civil servants too must vote normally like other voters if not on duty on polling day.

The postal ballot system must be transparent. Party agents should be allowed to monitor the entire process of postal voting.

3. Use of indelible ink
Indelible ink must be used in all elections. It is a simple, affordable and effective solution in preventing voter fraud. In 2007, the EC decided to implement the use of indelible ink. However, in the final days leading up to the 12th General Elections, the EC decided to withdraw the use of indelible ink citing legal reasons and rumours of sabotage.

BERSIH 2.0 demands for indelible ink to be used for all the upcoming elections. Failure to do so will lead to the inevitable conclusion that there is an intention to allow voter fraud.

4. Minimum 21 days campaign period
The EC should stipulate a campaign period of not less than 21 days. A longer campaign period would allow voters more time to gather information and deliberate on their choices. It will also allow candidates more time to disseminate information to rural areas. The first national elections in 1955 under the British Colonial Government had a campaign period of 42 days but the campaign period for 12th GE in 2008 was a mere 8 days.

5. Free and fair access to media
It is no secret that the Malaysian mainstream media fails to practice proportionate, fair and objective reporting for political parties of all divide. BERSIH 2.0 calls on the EC to press for all media agencies, especially state-funded media agencies such as Radio and Television Malaysia (RTM) and Bernama to allocate proportionate and objective coverage for all potlical parties.

6. Strengthen public institutions
Public institutions must act independently and impartially in upholding the rule of law and democracy. Public institutions such as the Judiciary, Attorney-General, Malaysian Anti-Corruption Agency (MACC), Police and the EC must be reformed to act independently, uphold laws and protect human rights.

In particular, the EC must perform its constitutional duty to act independently and impartially so as to enjoy public confidence. The EC cannot continue to claim that they have no power to act, as the law provides for sufficient powers to institute a credible electoral system.

7. Stop corruption
Corruption is a disease that has infected every aspect of Malaysian life. BERSIH 2.0 and the rakyat demand for an end to all forms of corruption. Current efforts to eradicate corruption are mere tokens to appease public grouses. We demand that serious action is taken against ALL allegations of corruption, including vote buying.

8. Stop dirty politics
Malaysians are tired of dirty politics that has been the main feature of the Malaysian political arena. We demand for all political parties and politicians to put an end to gutter politics. As citizens and voters, we are not interested in gutter politics; we are interested in policies that affect the nation.

Certainly reforms like automatic registration of voters for example will eliminate the need for manual registration of voters that creates the notion of phantom voters. We have the right tools and resources, so what’s keeping us from deploying them to ensure everyone of the right age automatically qualifies to vote on who will represent them in Parliament.

And if the EC and the Government are of the opinion that they have done the best to ensure a fair and just election process, just have a look at the recent Sarawak State Election where there were incidents that prevented a fair and just election process.

In the past, we have called for fair and just election process through the press statements, letters, memorandums, petitions and more but progress towards fair and just election process has been rather slow. Sometimes, it does take a public rally with thousands of people from different background and cause to drive the point home. It happened with Bersih 1.0 and we can expect the same awareness with Bersih 2.0.

What we request in the end from the Government is a promise to allow the rally to proceed and end peacefully and thereafter to take Bersih 2.0’s demands for reforms. After all, doesn’t the needs of the nation takes precedent over the needs of political agendas?

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Give me one reason why I should march on 9th July 2011

Menuntut Kebersihan

Slaying the Real Bogeyman


(Who is the real bogeyman in Malaysia? Some people determined to prove that it is none other than fellow Malaysians. Image source: http://img1.fantasticfiction.co.uk)

53rd anniversary of our independence is just around the corner, and yet we continue to read these nonsense – we should be ashamed of ourselves.

Read this first:-

In response, Tee said that the country does not want Ang’s children, whether legal or illegitimate, a favourite line he continually implies about the Chinese.

“She does not need to send her ‘children’ (if any were legitimate) to national school, if she is not confident with the national school or she is scared that her ‘children’ will become Malays. Her ‘children’ are not needed here.

“Just send her ‘children’ to schools in her homeland or overseas. The presence of ‘children’ are not needed here,” he said in a personal attack on Ang, who has also had two police reports lodged against her over her article.

(Source)

In response to that article, Aizuddin Danian said this:-

People like Helen Ang have proven themselves capable of critical thought. She’s taken an issue, examined the facts, and presented her argument in favour of her case. Instead of engaging her in discussion (Heaven forbid, she might have a valid point, who knows?), she becomes the subject of ad hominem attacks, and rudely invited to leave the country.

The worse thing for Malaysia is for her, and people like her (people capable of analyzing a problem and presenting a rational case), to take up the Lambs’ offer and leave. Just like any one of the 3 million Malaysians or ex-Malaysians who make their living away from the Motherland.

These are people who are able to compete at a global scale, world class human beings so to speak. Isn’t it a shame that many prefer not to ply their trade in our shores? Can we blame them for choosing greener pastures, or do we blame Lamb’s like Dr Mohd Ridhuan for driving them away by denying them the greens of our own garden and forcing them to make do with a diet of rocks and stones?

Somewhere else, we read this:-

Malay rights group Perkasa has urged the government to review the proposal to carry out open tender for the sale of strategic land, saying the move could erode “the little remaining assets owned the Malays and Bumiputera.”

(Source)

That call was objected with this:-

Open tenders by the government for the sale of strategic land would not erode Malay interests, says Kedah Gerakan Youth

(Source)

In every “race” in Malaysia for many years now, we have been fed with an invisible bogeyman from time to time by greedy, twisted politicians and agenda filled race based NGOs.

The Malays for example have always been told that the non-Malays in particular the Chinese is out to get them, out to strip them of their “rightful” rights and powers (even more so after the opposition had a major win in the last general election). The non Malays on the other hand have been told that implementation of Islamic way of life, will erode their beliefs and cultural values. So, that is what we been told explicitly and impliedly, over many form of media.

And for those who had never ventured out from the country, the only “foreigners” they see on daily basis are Malaysians from different cultural and racial background and with the constant lies by the politicians and NGOs; fear for fellow Malaysians is created.

To create further uneasiness, fellow Malaysians are also been labeled as “pendatang” (immigrants or squatters) by, ironically, the very people whom ancestors were immigrants themselves.

Khir Toyo’s father for example was from Indonesia, Ahmad Sabri’s grandparents were from India and the Mohd Ridhuan who rudely asked Helen Ang to send her “illegitimate” kids to her “homeland” – his ancestors were from China. At end of the day, we are all “pendatang” but you make yourself looking like an idiot when you start calling others “pendatang” but failed to recognize that you are a “pendatang” too.

They don’t realize how small we are when we are against the global community and only by being strongly united we can bring up this country at par with the developed countries. It is not the time to create fear and uneasiness among fellow Malaysians and foreign investors as whole – not when we are seeing the Foreign Direct Investments figures plunging down in recent months.

Instead of “conveniently” putting the blame on fellow Malaysians for all the shortcomings, self weaknesses and as a mean of unity the community against the oppositions, let’s focus on slaying the REAL bogeyman, shall we?

Implementation of NEP, NEM, Affirmative Policies

Some NGO says that Malay rights will be eroded with the removal of NEP but everyone knows that whilst the spirit of NEP is highly commendable, the implementation of the NEP has not been one. The PM’s banker brother even goes on to say that the NEP has been “bastardised”:-

The New Economic Policy (NEP) is “bastardised” as it deviated from its goal of poverty eradication, CIMB group chief executive officer Datuk Seri Nazir Razak said.

He said the NEP, formulated by second prime minister Tun Abdul Razak Hussein, had come a longway from a social engineering experience, which was aimed at uplifting the livelihood of the people, especially Bumiputeras.

“But now, it (NEP) is so embedded in everything we do, in every part of government and businesses that it has become a problem. And every time I mention the NEP, I get blasted.”

(Source)

Many in the Government do realise the weaknesses in the implementation of policies such as NEP (now re-coated as NEM) but when it is raised, it is faced with objections. Often the question on the weaknesses of the implementation (and not the policy itself) is often met with claims that it is questioning the Malay rights. At the end of the day, the weakness in implementation remains unresolved and is left to be abused further.

Tony Pua of PR recently suggested the removal of Bumiputera discounts for properties more than RM500,000 and rechannel that money for Malays who did not have enough money to buy properties. His suggestion – instead of reviewed positively (to redistribute wealth from the rich to the poor), was taken as questioning the Malay rights. Tony Pua at the end got a death threat and bullets in his mail.

Mismanagement of public funds

Wastage of tax-payers money by expensive and wasteful projects is nothing new in Malaysia. The Malays forms about 60% of Malaysians on whole. So, if the Government can be more prudent with its spending, curtail unnecessary wastages and channel the available funds for development where the people will benefit to the maximum, who is benefit the most? Mismanagement of public funds is one bogeyman that these racial politicians and NGOs should focus on.

And with mismanagement of funds, we all know, corruption usually tags along.

MACC have started to work its way to nab the bigger fish but it is has a long way to go before it can gain the public trust and respect. Sarawak Report has been uncovering pretty interesting revelation on a certain Chief Minister and his family’s wealth. Based on the allegations (backed with documents and facts), there seems to be a clear case of mismanagement of funds, abuse of powers and no proper distribution of wealth from the state to the people. But then again, this could be just the tip of the iceberg. Corruption is another bogeyman that has been let on loose for a very long time now.

Quality of life

Malaysia is not far off in terms of quality of education but how far we are off from creating quality graduates? Students are not allowed to participate in politics and those who go against the establishment are often punished. How many of the graduates is allowed to think rationally and out-of-the box? How many of them is well equipped to meet the challenges of today and excel in any fields they are in?

We already dismissed the English language in favor of the national language but for the wrong reasons. Can we maintain the quality? So, instead creating fear among Malaysians, why can’t these politicians and NGOs fight for better schools and quality graduates?

There has been a call to review and revise the minimum salary for Malaysians and whilst cost of living have gone up (what more with the removal government subsidies on key consumer items), it has been unfortunate that the general level of disposal income of Malaysians have not gone up accordingly. At the end of the day, Malaysians find that it is getting more difficult to bridge the expense – income gap. So, instead creating fear among Malaysians, why can’t these politicians and NGOs fight for better wages? Better wages means better business environment – are we in the right position for that? Fear against fellow Malaysians is not the right factor to create ideal business environment.

The above is just a handful of issues that the politicians and NGOs can spend time for the betterment of the community instead of wasting time hunting for a bogeyman that is not – fellow Malaysians. It is better for Malaysia and for the community. Let’s slay the real bogeyman instead of wasting time creating disunity among fellow Malaysians. Not when we are turning 53 years old.

I once watched a movie where a man is seen heading the shouting at a political rally. He looked so emotional and nothing seemed to stop him from making a point. When a friend asked him why he is participating in this rally, he said he did not know. He heard people shouting and decided to join in.

Similarly, let do the fighting where it is needed the most – real issues that affects all Malaysians. Let’s not make a fool of ourselves by creating an issue that distracts the rest from the real issues and get overworked with it.  Let’s not shout for the sake of shouting. After 53 years, we certainly can do better than this.