Snippets – 15 May 2015


myvi

(It is indeed a tragic when an infant dies due to another road user who cared less of the safety of others but other than feeling sad & saying our condolences, what we are doing to ensure another person does not dies in the same manner? Image source: the Net)

Couple days ago, we celebrated Mother’s Day in a big way, thanks to my cousin who organised it. We grouped all the “Moms” to a corner and had the oldest – my grandmother (my mom’s mom) to cut the cake. It was memorable to see the grand lady leading the pack of moms in the celebration.

And whilst the ladies had their own activities, the guys had their own – drinking cold ice beer whilst catching up on the latest news on work, economy, politics, travel and on other times we had been drinking. It was something that I missed in recent times especially when everyone been so busy with their own family and work. I lost count of the cans of beer that I had but it was one of the few nights that I really had a good night sleep. And I did not have any hang-overs in the morning as well. I felt very fresh and was all ready to go to work.

And I think everyone deserves a good night sleep with the confidence that the country is in safe hands. Unfortunately it is not. The truth is the country is in a big bloody mess and we have a Prime Minister who is not only clueless but also thinks that a few show of support from his usual ball carriers means the whole country is squarely behind him. There was a big hoo-haa when Tabung Haji bought over the 1MDB’s land for a value that is much higher than what 1MDB paid for. But that is still fine, property price over time and with improvements made on the land, the price may have appreciated. But that is not why people got pissed off in the first place.

The real reason why people got pissed off was the fact that the people who was involved denied it at first until the evidences started to appear on the internet. Have they forgotten, these days, information flies faster than speed of sound and all information is available at one’s finger tips.

Anyway, as I had said, the country is in a big bloody mess and politicians are still trying to hide the crap under the carpet. And one is going to indulge the many reporting on 1MDB recently, it is going to be a never ending story. And despite the reporting and promises to “get to the bottom” of it, no one been caught and brought in for questioning. Even the fat guy is less worried and is on a shopping spree (hopefully with his own personal money)

One just hope that my fellow Malaysian will still remember this when it comes to the next general election. No matter what kind of “I help you, you help me” promise of better roads, sacks of rice, new schools, donations, new bridge or new houses pledged, it should be the last time that we want to allow something similar to happen again. It will take probably years to clean up the current mess.

Let come back on something that worth a good read and in a way inspirational – thanks this post:-

At the primary school level, up to UPSR, the Tamil schools are scoring the highest grades for science and mathematics. They are even beating the Chinese schools. They have left the sekolah kebangsaan behind. (Sekolah agama, sekolah pondok semua tak payah sebut lah ok.)

And now the Tamil schools are getting into the top league in the UPSR exams. As an example, for 2014 the SRJK (Tamil) Taman Tun Aminah in Johor Bharu produced the best UPSR results in Malaysia. 43 students scored straight 7-A’s and another 43 students scored 7-B’s. Another Tamil school in Johor the SRJKT Masai has also been hitting the big leagues in the UPSR.

(Source)

Whilst I admire and respect the good people behind ASTI (they are doing the right things at the right rime), the fact is there is still an imbalance of how we educate our kids as whole.

Tamil schools despite their shortcomings in terms of logistics and space is doing well due to their teachers and school administrators. And I am sure every types of schools have their own elite accomplishments and directions. For that, I salute them. It is not easy to achieve those things when your hands are tied. But in the end, it does not and will never represent unity. We are still segregating kids by the race, language and perhaps how much money their parents have in their pockets.

Of course, politicians and national policies plays a big role here. But they can only do so much. The other one third need to come from the schools & teachers themselves (as how the Tamil schools have been doing remarkably) whilst the remaining one third is from the parents. Failed to do your duties in any one of them and you will end up with a kid that weak in the command of the language (the one and only English) and subjects that matters most in the new millennium- Science and Mathematics.

No idiot is going to allow you to fly to Mars based on your qualifications in religion (we already having weird revelations in that area). We need more rationale and scientific thinkers in our society.

Then we had the tragic incident of the 2 MYVI drivers who have been “allegedly” racing and ended up causing an accident that killed an infant and her two parents. Whilst the MYVI driver have been hauled up for investigations and will probably be charged for causing death from reckless and dangerous driving which may see the driver jailed between two and 10 years, and be fined between RM5,000 and RM20,000 if found guilty, here’s the sickening part of the whole affair – there is no effective way of booking the drivers who speed on the road.

Still remember AES? Still remember the bunch of morons from the opposition who made so much noise that the Government decided to hold back the wider implementation of AES? The end result of this – death of an infant.

And if the Government promises a better enforcement (as they usually do whenever they have dead bodies on the road), save the trouble – it is not going to happen. They have been saying the same thing on the express buses and motorcyclists without helmet & license but nothing have changed so drastically.

We need to cut to the chase and implement measures that will see a stricter enforcement of the traffic laws and stick on the implementation even if there are unreasonable “noises” questioning the need for such measures. We need to make Malaysian roads safer than ever. After all aren’t we among the top 25 most dangerous countries in the world for road users. It is something we should not be proud off.

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Millions for Schools


Seriously, do we have that much of money to toss around or is Christmas simply early this year?

(Think of it as an investment for the future – schools that does  not have enough money to run is going to greatly impact its students and their performance in education. Image source: http://www.connectmidmissouri.com)

If there is one thing I take with great concern, it has to be on the direction of the education system in this country. And in the last few weeks, there has been major development in regards to this – one was the unrevealing of the national blueprint for 2013 – 2025 and the other was this:-

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak has announced an allocation of RM30mil for the development of Chinese national-type secondary schools (SMJK) in the country. During his address at the MCA annual general assembly here Sunday, Najib said he had discussed the matter with Deputy Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin, who is also the Education Minister, and they had agreed to grant RM30mil for the schools.

Earlier in his presidential address, MCA chief Datuk Seri Datuk Seri Dr Chua Soi Lek had appealed to the Prime Minister for assistance for these schools, saying there was currently no allocation for them. “There are 78 conforming schools with more than 125,000 students. They should be given an allocation of RM50mil next year,” he said.

(Source)

It is not the first or last time we have heard of this kind of “sincerity” from the Government especially when the general election is coming up soon:-

For how long more we can keep giving away the money when source of fund is truly limited?

In the first place, we have yet to see any concrete plans from anyone to merge the various “types” of school in this country into one common type where it will be easier to manage them under the same policy and consolidated funding. What we have seen so far is perpetuation of this segregation and any attempts to introduce any form of integration of schools) are often met with passionate, angry response from certain community leaders and compounded with undue political pressure. Sometimes illogical reasons like quick diminish of the mother language & culture with the younger generations feeds the fear of change, sometimes the grave concern of the difference of quality between the various types of school makes the segregation sounds valid (argument that Chinese schools teachers are more responsible and more concerned about the students’ development, an argument to keep the Chinese schools still relevant, on the other hand is utter rubbish).

Why we have not been able to integrate the schools after 55 years of independence? Is it a question of emotion or actual concern? Tony Pua in 2007 wrote this:-

The recently launched National Education Blueprint 2006 by Education Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein focuses purely on “strengthening the national schools”, with vernacular schools representing just a statistic in Malaysia’s education landscape. Vernacular schools are often neglected or treated with suspicion due to their ethnically Chinese or Tamil nature. There are widespread fears that the strengthening or even the presence of vernacular schools in Malaysia is antithetical to achieving national unity.

Chinese and Tamil educationists on the other hand, fear the strengthening of national schools will erode the future character and viability of vernacular schools. For many of them, every facet of the existing vernacular education must be protected at all cost. Otherwise, they fear detractors will pounce on any signs of weakness to destroy vernacular education in this country.

As a result, parties on both sides of the equation treat the issue of national versus vernacular schools as a zero sum game — one party’s gain is the other’s loss. However, such views are certainly flawed and works against the interest of a multi-racial and multi-cultural country like Malaysia. They are bred through mistrust and hardened by years of negative experiences.

Vernacular school educationists are also, understandably, unconvinced by the “national unity” argument because the government has taken steps to build and expand MRSM secondary schools which are almost exclusive domains of ethnic Malays.

Rita Sim in August 2012 also talked about the strength and weaknesses of Chinese schools in the country. And one of her argument for the existence of Chinese School is this:-

From the economic perspective, the rise of China puts a global economic superpower in our immediate neighbourhood and we would be foolish not to harness Chinese schools to enhance cultural and linguistic capital for our national professional, commercial and diplomatic advantage. Every Malaysian has the opportunity to benefit because our Chinese schools are not discriminatory.

Are you saying that if Afghanistan becomes the next global economic superpower (let’s run with our wild imagination, shall we?), we should drop everything and start Pastho/Dari schools? We have yet to put our foot down on ensuring good command of English (p.s. the language of many economic superpowers in the world – Japanese, French & Spanish is another) in our national education biosphere and here we are only focussing on the Chinese language. And if we apply the same argument for Tamil schools, then why we are not learning Hindi? So why not just address the reasons to maintain the vernacular schools – come up with the best win-win solution for students, teachers and students whilst still maintaining the high standard of education all around with good emphasis on the issue of language (let’s have Chinese & Tamil classes on the daily basis & on extra hours if we still insist on equipping ourselves with language of the economic superpowers) and force all to be converted into national school where it can be fully funded by the Government?

It is a fact that not all Chinese and Tamil vernacular schools are fully funded schools; they need to apply to the Government for the additional funding and this is where the problem usually starts. The schools have to rely on the Government and by some extension, politicians to get the necessary funding for schools and this has not been easy for some schools especially Tamil schools. And those who have decided that they will remain as vernacular schools despite these improvements and resists all attempts for national integration should be left standing on their own. And in the end, we will only have 2 types of school in this country – fully funded public and self funded private schools.

Of course, announcing millions of ringgit for the vernacular schools is one thing (after all anyone can announce anything under the sun), the vernacular schools seeing the actual dough (or sometimes land) for its expansion & non-Government funded operations is another thing all together. It takes too long for these schools to get the money but the problems facing them simply compounds on daily basis especially for the students. Sometimes the actual disbursement of the funds – the final amount and the time it is finally disbursed is made slightly complicated with the presence of “middleman”. There is a high chance of the money is passed from the Government to middleman to be managed and only trickles are passed on to these schools at the end of the day.

Giving away money to school is just a short term fix to a long term problem – yes, it provides an immediate relief to the problems that the school are facing but it does not really provide the long term solution to long term problems. It does not really address the issue of sustainability of money for schools. The Government does not have deep pockets to keep giving away money to schools on yearly basis and there are other areas of the administration that the Government need to look into as well (healthcare, defence, crime-fighting, etc but not the plans like BRIM which simply gives out money but does not really address the issue of low income in the long run). The state of the country’s economy and management of the money that we have also dictates how much these schools is going to get its share of the pie in the future and one cannot guarantee a high performance economy all the time.

There is only so much that the schools can do to self-manage funding for schools – the yearly school fees, donations from parents & other individuals (many prefer to donate to temples than to schools), fund raising activities and perhaps (to those who have the right infrastructure) rentals collected from booking of school halls for other functions & sports activities. Some even advise automation & going green as part of the cost cutting measures. Those schools with the right connection can look into additional funding from State Government and perhaps sponsorship from some private organisations on land, equipment and money but it does not apply to all schools especially those tucked away in deep rubber estates.

The more viable option would be to convert themselves from partially funded schools to fully funded schools and that means to change from vernacular type school to national type school where the main language of the day is Bahasa Malaysia and English with high importance to Mandarin & Tamil. This will also resolve another factor that contributes to dwindling number of students in some of the vernacular schools (and thus directly the funding for schools). When all are national schools adhering to the same standards and policies, it will be easier to distribute the students as well (some schools are now overcrowded, others barely have regular students).

One must remember that at the end, the one who truly suffer due to inconsistent funding and difference in policies are the students. Not the Minister, the Ministry, the politicians who is looking for an opportunity or community educationalists who insist on priority of language & culture without looking for a long term solution especially when it comes to funding to schools.

Race Based Resolutions


UPDATE: Here’s one with MCA in the main role

Back to the original post

Seriously we need less of it…

(Tamil schools in Malaysia often suffer from poor image, under funding and poorly equipped infrastructure and despite the improvement of exam results over the years and promised assistance from the Government and political parties, there is doubt why it has not been merged into national schools. Image source: http://www.makkez.com)

MIC may have gotten their 2nd Minister-ship back to entice Indian voters to back BN but here lies the danger of backing a race based political party:-

Housing, jobs, education and socio-economic concerns were among the nine resolutions passed by some 4,000 branch chairman and delegates during MICs 65th general assembly.

However, they sought a fair distribution of benefits under the transformation programs, in particular ensuring that Tamil primary schools are properly equipped with pre-school facilities in line with the 87% target set by the Government for all primary schools to offer pre-school classes. At present, only 17.5% Tamil primary schools offer pre-school classes with MIC seeking to ensure that the remaining schools are fully equipped by this year.

(Source)

Does this means MIC going to be the sole champion of Tamil schools again?

Are they only capable of representing and fighting for the best deals for one particular race? It seems to be case most of the time – MIC for the Indians, MCA for the Chinese and UMNO for the Malays. And at every general assembly, we will hear this year in, year out. Surprisingly during election period, the same blokes who pledge to fight for his race will turn around and tell you that they will do everything they can for the voters who no doubt will not be from one particular race. So, which is which now?

That is why the voters should be more vigilant and reject any race based politics. If there is a true 1Malaysia concept out there, the last it needs is a segregation of Malaysia by the color of the skin and beliefs at primary school level (and if one goes by MIC’s latest resolution, at pre-school level).

Malaysians segregated when still young at primary school level will likely to face problems when they are united back during secondary school level. This is because it will take time for them to interact, understand each other and accept the differences more effectively. Certainly things would be different if we start off early – 6 years before, at primary school level – when the mind is still young and innocent. This is what “one school for all” strives to achieve.

Now MIC is resolute to ensure that Tamil primary schools are properly equipped with pre-school facilities in line with the 87% target set by the Government for all primary schools to offer pre-school classes. But whilst it is good to have pre-school classes at primary level, this is wrong way to go about it. Because this is how the old, corrupt and hard-to-change MIC would be go about it. Besides, some of the existing primary schools are already in bad condition. Wonder how a pre-school classes is going to improve the school as whole?

If indeed MIC has truly changed, it should change its paradigm as well. It should do something unthinkable, something very drastic.

It should think at nation’s level – not at community level alone. First thing it should resolute to do and certainly it will do the community (if it still insist) a great service in the long run, is to ABOLISH all Tamil Schools (or convert them all to national schools) and get all students to be enrolled in one school that unites all – fully subsidized, well equipped National Schools backed by highly qualified teachers.

And if MIC still intends to hold one for the community (for old time sake), it will resolute to ensure that the language Tamil should be part of the syllabus in all national schools and where one can take it as an optional exam papers (after all there is no harm having an option to learn additional language other than English and Bahasa Malaysia – India and China will be the two biggest economy powerhouse in the near future).

Tamil primary school ends at Standard 6 – these students at the end of the day need to be integrated back into the national school environment and the unfortunate part is these students will not be integrated immediately – they will spend another year in “remove classes” before the start of a slow, painful process of being united back with fellow Malaysians.

Can we cut to the chase?

Money for Schools


Here’s why we don’t trust the politicians to handle our future…

(Only in Malaysia…schools in shop lots. Image source: Malaysiakini)

Well, just contrast these reports on the same day:-

The Johor government will build 122 more religious schools which are estimated to cost about RM200mil.

“They will be completed within the next two years,” Mentri Besar Datuk Abdul Ghani Othman said. At present, there are 552 religious schools in the state.

Speaking to newsmen after launching the Religious Teachers Day celebrations here yesterday, he said the state government had spent about RM40mil in the past five years to improve facilities in religious schools.

(Source)

And

Private firms have been urged to each “adopt” at least one of the 523 Tamil schools nationwide which are in dire need of funds for maintenance, Malaysia Nanban reported.

Deputy Minister in Prime Minister’s Department Datuk T. Murugiah said more firms should come forward to allocate money to help these schools.

“Most Tamil schools, especially those in the estates, are in need of funds to repair their premises as they are dependent on allocations from the Education Ministry,” he was reported as saying.

(Source)

That’s great – 2 types of schools with 2 kinds of treatment, right here in Najib’s so-called 1Malaysia.

In recent days, Najib have been talking about cost cutting measures in tackling the issue of cutting down the subsidies (we are not buying the bullshit though – politicians can promise the heaven but until they take the right first steps and enforce the right policies, they can bullshit until the sky turns pink).

Is it worth spending another RM200 million on new religious schools when the existing schools are in dire straits? I don’t have anything against religion but given the trend of the world today, do we really need more religion “specialists” instead of more scientists, doctors, engineers or other professionals?

How about basic education on Science, Maths and Language?

Instead wasting money on religious and Tamil and etc schools, can the Government just cut the bullshit and force everyone to go to fully funded national schools where facilities can be well maintained, education quality is set to the highest level and unity among young Malaysians are further fostered? Why the gamble on the next generation’s future? We already took the wrong step by reversing on the decision to teach Maths and Science in English (and yet we hear “traces” of call to bring this back). So, what’s next?

And one day when the Government decides to cut down on the subsidies, we really wonder whether the money saved from all these subsidies would be channelled back to strengthening our education system. Or will it be “distributed to its goons” as many is predicting?

By the way, Murugiah’s call for private firms to “adopt’ Tamil schools is a wasteful endeavour. We have a bad track record when it comes to sponsorships. In Malaysia, nothing is done for free unless there is a profit to be made or kick-backs given somewhere. Instead of asking the private firms, why can’t the Government itself take over these schools and turn it to national school where all Malaysians will have equal opportunity to basic education?

It is scary to wonder on how the Government is going to tackle the allocation of cost when it comes to funding the education for young Malaysians? Are they going to sit down and check on the right priorities? The Government already said that it is not having enough money to go around.

We really don’t need the wasteful endeavours now and certainly we can do with less idiotic politicians running the show in the background.

Read Also

Extra SPM Paper

Support for 1Sekolah

Temples vs Schools


Actually this is something that me and my cousin have in our minds for some time now…

(Having beautiful temples is good but having better educated students is better – Image source: http://media.merchantcircle.com)

This will be, in my opinion, one of the best ideas to come when it comes to our fellow Indians’ behaviour with donation money and temples.

From Raged Indian:-

Why build thousands of temples when our Indian children can’t even afford to go to the school? Why the fuck do we need air conditioned temple? So that people will call our God ‘cool’ eh? The Tamil schools don’t even have a ceiling fan, and we have fully tiled expensive marble temples all over the country?

We have the biggest statue in the world, and we also have the first school to be located in shop houses. We point our fingers towards the politician, but shouldn’t we be looking in the mirror? The change should be with us. We’re the one to be blamed.

We hesitate to give to another human being, but we do not hesitate to give it to God. When had God used your money? He do not need your pocket money all la! If you’re saying by donating directly to the school, the schools might misuse the money; then what about all the money you give out to the temple; it goes to Lord Sivan’s pocket is it?

We are so scared about God and punishment that we eventually forget what He said in the first place, to help fellow human beings first, not Him. He does not need your fruits, rice or any other things. We, humans are the one who need it. We give out so many offerings to the God, using our hard earned cash, when none of them realistically would reach God.

Ayya veke ayam, attha veke atte kutiyum vettenethe pothum pa…

Annual festival in the temple and you take part in as much as ‘Abishegam’ (ceremonies) as possible. You pay between RM 51 to sometimes as higher as RM 1001 for something that is solely based on your faith. Is there a price for faith? Will God not accept prayers from the poor?

If all this funds can be redirected to schools, imagine how many thousands of children would study in a much more excellent condition than below cramped and hot classrooms?

It is a noble idea especially people have been bugging me to donate “generously” to temples and especially on certain days of the year so that me and my family will get that “extra” blessings. Well, it has not be to only Indian students but to any Malaysian students who been derived of proper environment for better educations. Poor students in schools, facilities depleted schools and struggling charity homes should take precedent to cash rich temples.

Further, with many small temples still hesitating to merge with other smaller temples and create a more efficient temple administration, depriving them of the extra cash in yearly festival donations may just be the trigger to force them to merge into one bigger temple.

Read Also

Temple Fiasco Revisited

Samy Vellu & RM50 Million?

Extra SPM Papers


Sometimes I truly don’t understand some people and their true intentions especially when one is having politicians in the picture…

(SPM students with their results – Image source: http://pemudasarawak.wordpress.com)

First read these Malaysiakini news snippets:-

QUIT! NGOs tell MIC, MCA, Gerakan ministers – The NGOs are peeved with their failure to speak up in the interest of the Chinese and Indian communities over the SPM controversy.

Let PM resolve SPM ruling controversy – MIC president S Samy Vellu has asked all parties disputing the Education Ministry’s latest SPM ruling to give time to the prime minister to resolve it.

Vernacular examination not acceptable, says Dr Subra – The MIC vice-president says he is not agreeable to the suggestion by the Education Ministry that schools conduct their own vernacular examinations for SPM students.

Quit! DCM tells ‘deaf’ Education DG – Continuing to see red over the ’10 subject’ cap for SPM, Penang’s P Ramasamy accuses Alimuddin of not listening to the people.

Rally against 10-subject cap for SPM – About 30 Indian-based NGOs will hold a rally on Dec 12 in protest against the government’s decision to cap the maximum number of SPM subjects at 10.

After several years in the making and general complaining, the Government have finally made the right move of restricting the number of subjects that student can take for SPM to 10 (or is it now 12 after some selfish quarters had make noise?).

Hopefully with this, gone the days when we see students with 18As or 20As for SPM who then have tough time getting seats in the local universities or unable to capitalise effectively on their hard earned exam papers.

Don’t get me wrong but forcing students to go all out to sit for all available SPM papers under the sun does not necessary make brilliant students in the end. In some cases, they may end nothing but ‘great memorisers’ or stressed out geeks.

The core subjects are already been covered namely Bahasa Melayu, English, Islamic Education or Moral Studies, History, Mathematics and Science. The students have another 6 papers for other subjects.

Students Point of View

Saying that one got 18As or 16As for SPM may look like that they are some ‘super whiz kid’ for some and seem to be a good excuse to be boasting around for some parents but is it really worth it?

Nut Graph posed this question:-

Why do SPM students take so many subjects? – Quest for knowledge or a race to obtain more straight As?

Would a student with 10As be any dumber compared to the students with 20As? What about their co-curriculum activities? What about their outlook on society and the country as whole? Would anyone care to answer?

(Exams can be very stressful and why need to add with more exam papers – image source: http://blogs.warwick.ac.uk)

Think of the stress and available time for revisions and learning of the subjects to be examined in SPM. Shouldn’t students be allowed to spend quality time on other things than just studying to sit for SPM and getting As which may worth nothing but a measure to gain into local universities?

Tamil School Point of View

It is rather strange to see an all-out fight for Tamil papers for SPM. No, it is not strange but rather laughable. It is nothing but very political in nature.

At the moment, especially for MIC, Pakatan Rakyat politicians and those “30 Indian based NGOs”, there are more pressing issues than just worrying of having Tamil as one of the subjects for SPM exams.

If you think about it, which is better for Tamil school students sitting for SPM – better school and facilities or more exam papers for Tamil?

(Classes done in school canteen and without proper chairs and tables – Image source: Malaysian Tamil Schools Blog)

For years, despite MIC gung-ho participation in Tamil schools administration (including one where the land designated for school was rumoured to be under the President’s name), quite a number of schools are still in sorry state – some with lack of facilities and space for students (remember classes held in canteen or cargo container or in some shop lot?).

Instead of shouting for one more paper for SPM, the politicians and NGOs should be shouting out for better facilities and teaching access. There is no lack of brilliant students wanting to learn and better themselves with good education. This is despite the sorry state of their schools and financial standing of their families.

Read this post that states the current sorry state of Tamil schools:-

There were about 10 students who are having transport problem coming to the school. Actually most of the students are from surrounding the estate.

One girl from standard 4, Thevadharshini who has other 6 siblings, whose alcoholic father had deserted them, was about to drop out of the school. Her mother had send the elder brother to a welfare home. Quick intervention from the Headmaster managed to keep her in school.

Everyday a teacher picks the girl up and drives her to the school and drops her back on the way home. I went through Thevadharshini’s records and she has scored nothing less then 90% in most of the subjects.

Throughout the 4 years, she has done well in the school.

(Source: Malaysian Tamil Schools Blog)

There are still many students especially in the estate located schools who do not have proper learning facilities, uniforms, transportation and meals. With almost everyone jumping to be IT savvy, there is a clear need for computers for the Tamil schools

Last Words

During my time, number of papers that we sat for in SPM was definitely less than 12 papers and despite higher passing marks and better quality of syllabus, many of us did not end up in the slums. Not doing more than 12 papers for SPM was not the end of world for us back then and it still should be so for current generation of students.

Let’s strive for quality instead of quantity for SPM and all exams at national level. Get better learning environment for our students. Times are changing – learning not necessary have to be endorsed in exam papers.

With advent of technology and many sources of information readily available at one’s finger tips, are we still going to decide the fate of our students on the number of papers that they sit for?

It is also time to revamp the whole education system in favour for common schools for all students.

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How many As are too many?

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