Off to a Funeral


mas

(No matter what, Malaysia remains where my heart and soul lies at the end of the day. And nothing kicks starts the notion than flying on the national carrier whilst having hot delicious nasi lemak for company)

Somehow it was great to fly back on MAS – for a couple of things.

One, it was good to hear safety announcements in Bahasa Malaysia again. Two, they served nasi lemak for lunch which was a sure sign that we are heading back home. And one of the first things that I did once I am back home was to catch up on my sleep. I could not help it – I even doze off whilst I was having conversations. Having a weekend and then thereafter the CNY holidays was just perfect to catch up on a break.

So I thought…

I was made “aware” of a distinct relative who was admitted to hospital in a serious condition. And last weekend, the dreadful news came. The relative had passed away. Being a distinct relative, there was always an option for me to simply opt out from going for the funeral. Further, the funeral was taking place in Johore – a place that was considered “quite far away” to drive (although it was almost the same distance and time to drive up North). The one that nails the urge for not going is that the funeral was taking place on a Sunday (I was working on Monday)

But there was 3 reasons that was prompted me to attend this funeral. First, despite it being a funeral of a distinct relative but he was somehow linked with other relatives who are closer to me. And there will be questions raised in the next family gathering. I had some obligations to them. Second, my father in law who is staying up in Taiping is taking the bus (yes the bus – we did not know, otherwise we would have picked him up half way) all the way to Johore for the same funeral. If he can take the bus and travel for 8-9 hours, then what’s stopping us with cars half way through from attending the same funeral, right? And third, the deceased had the same (well, almost) age as me (and brother in laws). Somehow, that made me to decided to go for the funeral.

It was time for planning for the one day trip to South and it was similar to the trip to the East Coast but with a small difference. We going to use my car as I am going to do most of the driving. It was a good opportunity to test the new tires. And to ensure it is going to be a fast drive down South and back, we decided to leave the ladies & kids at home (we already anticipating massive traffic jam on the way back, so it is best to leave the ladies and the children at home). In the car, would be me and 2 of my brother in laws (one is the substitute driver and another is our navigator – he had been to the house once)

The plan was finalised on Saturday evening (it took some time on the phone with various parties to finalise who was going and who was staying). My brother in law would pick up his wife and his daughter and another of the brother in law in the morning and meet me at my house. He would leave his car and drop his wife & daughter at my house (my wife and my kids will be around to keep them company).

map

(The trip down South – frankly the time and distance was similar to the trip up North but somehow it was less tiring. Perhaps it was because it has been almost 15 years since I made the trip to South)

We suppose to leave from my house (since it is nearer to the South compared to our 2 houses) at 5 am. I woke up at 4 am and by 4.45 am was all ready for the trip. I had even double checked the car and parked it outside the porch so that my brother in law can park his car easily. I also set the GPS coordinates and locked in the destination. At 5 am, he was no where to be seen. He finally showed up at almost 5.30 am – it was still good as my deadline remained 6 am (assuming we have a 4 hours to drive). The three guys finally left at about 5.45 am.

The journey to Johore was rather a pleasant one and surprisingly is not tiring compared to the trip up North. I hardly fell asleep along the way despite waking up earlier than usual. My new tires, Michelin XM2 was holding well and was quiet all the way. I had checked the route before hand (thanks, Google Map) and had decided to only use the GPS once we had reached the exit of the highway. No speeding on the highway and I maintain to the left lanes whenever possible. We made 1 pit stop at Pagoh for breakfast (a sorry looking nasi lemak with un-reasonable price was waiting for us). Quick breakfast and we were back on the highway and there was still more than 100 km to go before we reach the deceased’s house. Traffic was still sparse and it remained a smooth drive. It took us less than 4 hours including pit stop.

Using GPS is a must when venturing into an unfamiliar place and it was the case here too when we reached the house without getting lost. An uncle of mine who was not using GPS, got lost 4 times in the same area before finally finding the house. Fearing that there will be a big crowd later, we parked the car on the main road, some distance from the house but where I can still see the car from the house. We noticed a large tent outside the house which affirmed that we are at the right place. No familiar faces at the tent in front of the house, so we walked into the house. The coffin was in the middle of the house, surrounded by grieving family members. We said our condolences and prayers and headed back to the tent outside the house. The smell of chemicals inside the house was overwhelming and I started to feel dizzy.

Sitting under the tent outside the house with my brother in law (my father in law joined us soon after – he was tired after an almost 9 hours of traveling by bus) and with a fresh breeze, my head started to get clearer. Not many people have arrived despite the scheduled time for the deceased body was suppose to be taken to the crematorium. It suppose to be at 10 am but soon 10.30 am and 11 am had passed and soon it was showing 11.30 am. I looked at my brother in law and he looked at me – we suppose to leave at 11.30 am if we are going to make it home early. My brother in law went and talked to one of the relatives on the “status” – apparently there were some delay and we have to wait at least another 2 hours for the final ceremony (it actually took longer than that). I don’t blame them – no one prepares for a funeral upfront.

Wait for another 2 hours?

Well, that was our cue to take a “walk” to our car and head back home. Since there was a funeral, there were no “good-byes” and “see you later”. We quietly walked to my car – good thing it was parked far away and near to the house, otherwise our “early” departure would have been very noticeable.

traffic

(When things slows down on the highway, just make sure the car has enough petrol and the bladder empty. It was good that the traffic was moving despite the heavy traffic)

We had to head back to the highway, so GPS came in handy again. But before we do that, a short pit stop for fuel and use of bathroom was necessary. As I drove out, I misjudged a junction and took the wrong road. Thankfully the GPS was quick to recompute the route and in fact came out with a route with less traffic (so we could “fly” towards the highway). Soon, we found the toll plaza but it was not the NS toll booth (we mistakenly thought it was the NS toll). It was actually the 2nd Link Expressway. There was no lane for cash but instead all need Touch N Go for access. The problem was I left my TNG card at home and my brother in law did not have one either. Cars started to pill up behind us and when I thought we had a big problem at hand, I remember I had the Tesco loyalty card in my wallet and that came with TNG feature. It even had enough credit for the toll. We were saved!!

It was not long before we reached the actual NS highway and initially the traffic flow was good. We managed to clock 110 km/h most of the route. But once reached Negri Sembilan, the traffic started to crawl. R&R was packed full with cars as well. We made our pit stop at Ayer Keroh for fuel and a very late lunch. We could not find a parking spot but at further up front, we managed to find a spot and had an excellent nasi lemak with a good portion of chicken. There was long queue at the petrol station as well. Then it was back to the crawl on the highway. We finally reached home almost at 8 pm and despite being stuck with traffic jam most of the way (no thanks to road works and a couple of broke down express buses).

Despite I drove to and fro such a distance, all in one day, surprisingly I was not feeling that tired or sleepy. And after the late evening shower, I was still feeling fresh to drive to restaurant near the house for dinner.

Advertisements

Starting The Year 2015


Wow, one can only plan but the outcome is determined by the Al-Mighty

I thought I would have time to blog when we “walked” into 2015 but unfortunately that has not been the case. I am back on overseas assignment and things have picked up. Time is shorter, expectations are higher and working hours had been getting longer. It is cold these days and it gets worse at night. We usually finish our job (or rather I should say we take a break from our job) well after midnight for past one week. So imagine how cold it gets when we are waiting for our taxis (bus service have ended by then). Sometimes we are lucky, the taxi is waiting at the taxi stand. Other times like yesterday (rather this morning), we had walked a bit far in the cold and managed to grab one.

2015 will be a challenging year for me, personally because of the expected 1-2 trips to overseas for projects (one would be to a new country). Which also means I am going to miss my kids even more. But what one can do when work calls and one does not have any other choice, right? Besides I love my job too – challenging, always testing your patience and forces me to come up with creative ideas and keep up with out of the box thinking.

As for this blog, well, I won’t say that blog posts would be more regular – just see how far apart this first blog of 2015 has been. Perhaps I would do shorter blog posts akin to “tweets”.

I don’t foresee the situation of the country will improve in 2015 – we still have dumb politicians hanging on to powers and 1MBD still waiting to blow up on taxpayers’ face (they have changed the CEO but I don’t think the young guy is going to change anything). If holiday going PM is sent off on his permanent holiday and a major sweep of the housekeeping is done on old, stone-age thinking politicians and the religious & racial radicals in this country, then perhaps the country has a chance.

In the meantime, please enjoy this from Man Bai (the song that I listen on daily basis now as it gets colder on the outside)

I will catch up with you soon and have a good weekend ahead

P.s. belated Happy New Year

Snippets – 30 October 2014


AP72722033370_t607

(Hello friend, feeling jet-lag ah? This what happens if you fly too many times on tax payers money and do most of your “work” from overseas and leaves the country to run on auto pilot. Image The Net)

The post was originally slated to be posted last week (or was it the week before that? I can’t recall) but after half way through drafting it, I fell asleep. By the time, I had time to complete my draft, I had other thoughts and decided to start fresh again. You see, I am away on another assignment and the vicious cycle had started all over again.

This will probably be my 5th or 6th time I celebrated Deepavali thousands of miles away from home. The first time it happened, it was tough especially when my son had just born but over the years, it has been a norm for me and for my family. We would celebrate it once I am back from overseas assignment. We often do.

Almost Locked Out

How many times you have left the keys in the room and got yourself locked out? This guy in the video probably had the worst experience.

As for me, I had got locked out from the hotel room once when I was in Bangkok but I did not realised that until I came back from shopping and realized that I did not have the hotel access card with me. Thinking that I had dropped it at the shopping centre (thankfully it was nearby the hotel), I rushed and searched for the card but did not find them. Not knowing what to do next, I decided to head back to the hotel and tell them that I had misplaced the access card and requested for a new one. I was prepared to pay a hefty fine for losing the card but the lady at the counter promptly gave me another card without any question. When I walked into my room, I found my misplaced card – it was on the table.

Couple of days ago, I almost repeated this mistake. Almost. I took my wallet which had the apartment access card and the bus card (yes, I take the bus to work) and placed on the table as I was packing up to go to work. I realised I was late for work, so I quickly packed my bag, switched off the lights and head out to the lift when I remembered my wallet on the table. Damn! The door to the apartment cannot be opened without the access card and it will not be easy to get the guy at the counter to arrange for another key.

But something told me to double check my bag before I switch to a full panic mode. I opened the bag and saw my wallet. I don’t recall putting the wallet in my bag. Weird. It must have been instinct, I guess. Or it could be me getting old.

The PM is Away Again

As expected, another trip overseas!

This time he is in Dubai, once again at the taxpayers’ expense. So the country goes on auto pilot again. I just saw him giving press conference on the nation’s affairs from Dubai. Sometimes I wonder which country he is belong to.

So much so, he has become a joke of the country.

The rakyat were delighted to learn today, that our Prime Minister is planning a 9 day working visit to Malaysia.

“This is wonderful news!” said a government spokesman, “it’s very fortunate the PM was able to squeeze us into his busy schedule after trips to Azerbaijan, Netherlands, Ukraine, London, his European holiday, Dubai, and New York.”

“The PM will be meeting Malaysian university students studying here, as well as several captains of industry with the goal of enabling Malaysia to foster better relations with itself.” said a source in the PM’s department. “He definitely sees huge potential in Malaysia, and expects these meetings will bring mutual economic benefits to all!”

After the working visit, the PM accompanied by his wife, will then depart Malaysia for another place that is rumoured to be as far away as possible.

(Source)

Does the Prime Minister had to fly off and attend every shitty conferences, meetings, opening ceremonies and what-not overseas? Then what is his Ministers, Deputy Ministers and high ranking civil servants are doing back home? Ya sure, who do not want to fly on a private jet, all expenses paid for by the people of Malaysia, live in luxury hotel and have time for shopping and sight-seeing? But doesn’t he remembers that his job back home is far more important? The country needs a working Prime Minister and not a happy go lucky traveler.

It’s OK to burn the Bible!

The Old Man is talking nonsense again

The burning of religious texts, including the Al-Quran and the Bible, is allowed in specific instances, but not with bad intentions, said former Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad. When asked his opinion if Perkasa president Datuk Ibrahim Ali’s Bible-burning call was seditious, Dr Mahathir said Muslims often burnt old and worn copies of the Al-Quran, but were forbidden from throwing it around or stepping on it.

“So, if Muslims have some document they are adverse to, they should not throw it on the ground and step on it. “It was not his intention to provoke people into clashes between Muslims and non-Muslims,” he said.

On Monday, the Attorney-General (AG) issued a statement saying that Ibrahim’s call to burn Malay-language Bibles did not fall within the definition of a seditious tendency as it was said to defend the Islamic religion.

(Source)

Ibrahim Ali did not call for burning the Bibles because he had high respect for the Christians or the Bible had worn out or he had some good intention somewhere up his buttocks. He in fact said this:-

Perkasa president Ibrahim Ali has called on Muslims to seize and burn copies of Bibles which contain the term “Allah” or other Arabic religious words.

And why he want to burn them?

The Pasir Mas MP insisted that it was the only way to stop non-Muslims from stirring the sensitivities and sentiments of the majority of population in the country.

(Source)

Now, let’s reverse the situation for a second and consider what would happened. Would the Muslims would have stood back and accept that it is in the defence of another religion? Still remember Pastor Terry Jones and how the whole reacted to his idiotic proposal to burn the Quran? Similar thing happens here and the perpetrator walks off scot-free on silly excuses and reasons.

Aaaacccchooo!


Trip

(A shot from my latest trip overseas – it was not so late and we just had a good dinner and we were on a tram, going back to our apartment. It has been an interesting trip and probably with the best first impression thus far this year. More of it later once I have recovered and put the details on writing)

I don’t know why that it seems to happen every time I step out from the country. It could be the weather (yes blame it on the effect from global warming) or the food or my immune system in a very bad shape, I don’t know.

I just came back from another trip with a very stuffy nose – yes, I am breathing through my mouth now. I am going off for a few days for rest, far away from my projects and work (I will try to, anyway) and have plenty of bed rest, vitamin C and chicken soup to recover faster. I guess age is finally catching up on me and I need to slow down a bit. I need to accept that I no longer have the same endurance that I used to have 10-15 years ago and with my daughter in the picture, I need to take things slow and steady especially when I have another few trips overseas lined up until the end of this year.

Seriously 2014 has not been a good year for blogging (it has not been a good year for the aviation industry too) – I hardly be able to come up with a post at least once a week. Nowadays 2-3 weeks gap has been a norm. There is no lack of ideas or contents to write, I am pretty sure of it. But what is missing is the time to sit down and write type all these down and press the button to publish it.

There have been too many things happening in this world that in one way or another have moved us to think harder, be more compassionate to others and open our bloody mouth and act on it. The 2 MH tragedies, the slaughter that is happening in Gaza, Syria and Iraq and the various incidents that could easily trigger another World War 3.

Back home, things are not so rosy either. We have now PKR buggers battling each other for the post of MB of Selangor (what’s wrong with these people!), the water reserves drying up and this could mean another spell of water rations and Malaysia nowhere close to kicking out the religion and racial extremists from our society. These guys are having a field day with our PM still missing from the scene and remains silent. We are continuing to walk backwards whilst others have moved on past us.

And I am easily distracted too these days. Could this been the signs for me to finally stop blogging and move on? I have been blogging for more than 9 years now and the 1,590 posts I did is probably nothing to shout about but it has helped me in different ways. My writing skills have improved tremendously and I have forced to read and analyze on a lot of things for my blog posts and thus improved my grasps on many things others would have dismissed as trivial. I don’t know. Perhaps I could think better once I could breathe through my nose again.

Have a good weekend!

Trip to Oriental Paris – Part 6


I almost forgot about this and thought of doing a closure post but then I just realised that there are still plenty of photos of food in my collection. So, let’s do probably another 1-2 posts on food (this included) before we “head back” home.

One of the juicy advertisement as we head towards our ride at one of the underground trains – the famed Peking Duck. When we were in Shanghai, we did not really had this dish for lunch or dinner but then we decided not to look for the place that serve the dish as well. But a friend of us who went to Beijing for a short trip had the Peking Duck packed and brought it back home.

That small logo at the top of the menu almost caught us – at we thought it was KFC‘s menu for their local dish but then we took a closer look at realised that it is not Colonel Sanders and it is just a logo that was used by one of the smaller restaurants near to our workplace. After all if you can get a crystal clear “imitation” of the Rolls Royce in China, what more of well known international brands and well known fast food dishes.

Don’t be mistaken – they also have the real KFC restaurants in the city but despite it being cheap and easy, we decided not to go for it – a quick look in the inside and things was not looking too good. The queue was long (mostly with over-excited youngsters) and there were very limited tables and chairs inside the restaurant for those who wish to dine in (the area looked small and stuffy too) and with some of us with handful of shopping bags, we decided not to take the risk either.

There is also a Chinese (albeit cheaper) version of Subway in the city. It is known as Starway and they operate in the same manner as the real Subway with the same types of bread with the same options of filing and with the almost identical modus operandi as Subway (the founder must have been an ex-Subway staff). The people behind the counter speak fluent English too so ordering was a breeze. And we often opt for this simple dish of bread with “halal” fillings (halal since they don’t serve beef, surprisingly) instead of walking out far in the cold and get ourselves the more complex noodles for dinner.

Starway bread of the day packed and filled – it’s cheap (less than RMB20), cleaner and surprising very tasty and more than enough to cover our hunger when we end up working late. Unfortunately they don’t provide delivery service though but thankfully the restaurant was not far away from our workplace (it is not crowded too – the locals have not caught on the idea of having bread for lunch or dinner) and we had caring colleagues who were wiling to “ta-pau” for the rest of us who were busy working to resolve the issues so that we all can go back and have a good night sleep (after a couple bottles of beers, of course).

Here’s something I gotten fond of when I order my bread from Starway – cold fresh vegetarian drink and often, 1 bottle is not enough (it never was) and somehow I often felt more healthy drinking this than the hot plain Chinese tea but then again it could be just my imagination because I also had plenty of tea and beer during my stay in Shanghai and I never fell sick (even after I walked in the rain on several occasions)

Thankfully the sense of imitation did not extend to other kind of restaurants. The Korean fast food restaurant was pretty authentic with proper Korean dishes with Korean restaurant setting. Prices ranges from RMB40 to RMB120 and it was not so bad considering the portions was sufficient enough – it was heavy but was not overwhelming to our taste. The only complaint was the entrance to this restaurant – we had to go through a small lift and there was only one that was working, so we were praying for the lift not to breakdown when were inside the lift.

The good old “nasi goreng” – you can get them hot and tasty no matter where you go. This one was not that bad (I had better ones when I was in Ghana – the spicy scrimp fried rice was really, really good) but at least it was rather safe to eat – you know what is in it. I wished they had a good sambal to go with that.

Here’s another dish from the Korean restaurant that we went – more meat than the rest and gravy too. Ha, I already missing the home cooked chicken curry.

We also found a small Thai restaurant just behind the place we were staying – we almost missed it as there was no big sign-board on the front but it only realised that it is a Thai restaurant after we had checked inside (it looked like a bar from the outside). They had the usual Thai wish-list food on the menu but it was quite pricey and thus we decided to go safe by ordering fried rice. It was good but it was no where near to the usual fried rice that we often get at Thai restaurants – it was not spicy enough for our standards.

The Tom Yam that we had was not that good as the Tom Yam we get in Malaysia – it was more watery but it was slightly spicier than the other dishes. It was also missing some Thai ingredients but that is understandable – it may not be easy to get the right stuff in the city. But at least we got something closer to home than the usual noodles and soups. We also found Malaysian restaurant from the net but it was a bit from where we were staying and further since we are going back home soon, we decided to wait out and get real, cheaper Malaysian food once we are back.

To be continued…

Trip to Oriental Paris – Part 5


(Countdown – 322 days to “doomsday”)

Weekends are rest days and it is the best time to catch up on sleep and when that’s done, for the rest of the day, it is time to go around town.

One of the best ways to travel around the city is to use the ever excellent and efficient Metro service and we were just lucky to have a Metro station close to our hotel. Navigating around the station was not that difficult – plenty of large signs in English and color-coded arrows but for those who cannot communicate in Mandarin, you may have some trouble communicating with the Metro staff but then again, you will not have problem communicating with fellow passengers for assistance.

During our time, there were incidents of Metro trains stalling and derailing causing some injuries to some peak-hours passengers. So when some one proposed that we take Metro to go for shopping, we were a bit apprehensive about of safety. But then, we decided to take some chance – we did not think it was that bad. The journey itself was uneventful but it did gave us a good opportunity to see the Shanghai’s young generation in action. They dress well and almost all is playing games on their smartphones or listening to music. The adults on the other hand looks more stressed up. Everyone is rather quiet and minding their own business.

One of the places we decided to go using Metro this time is an old temple in Shanghai. We were hoping to do some shopping along the way as well.

The first place we went was the Jin’an Temple – it was an impressive structure in the middle of the city and next to shopping malls. It is said that it is the oldest temple in the city – built in 247 AD and was the site for China’s first Buddhist organization in 1912, then during the Cultural Revolution, it was converted into a plastics factory. We arrived at the temple early but somehow we decided not to enter inside the temple – the entrance fees or the modern outlook of the temple or maybe the time we arrived may have been the cause – I am not sure. We took some photos outside of the temple and contemplated on what would be the next move.

We then decided to go to another temple – the famed Jade Buddhist Temple that was built in 1882 to place the 2 jade Buddha statues which had been brought from Burma. The temple was crowded with tourists (they were arriving by the busloads which included a couple of Malaysians) and devotees (mostly old people) by the time we arrived. We went there in 2 taxis – it was easy to get a taxi to the temple but it is a different story when you want to leave – there is hardly a taxi on sight and there is a long queue at the taxi stand. We had to pay to enter this temple as well but if I was not wrong, the charges seemed cheaper.

Despite the actual age and compared to the Jin’an Temple, this temple looked older and a bit run-down. Whilst others decided to do some prayers – some of us decided to walk to the souvenir shops for some cheap Buddhist relics and other souvenirs for home (they were selling jade here as well). We knew some of the items on sale were priced higher than usual but we decided that the extra money that we paid for the items will probably go in the end, towards the temple and the administration cost which we did not mind.

The temple complex was quite extensive with several smaller buildings and it took a couple of hours to walk around the place. If you really look hard enough, there is plenty of things to see here – including decorative footpaths and a rather ancient looking pictures. We feel really warm in this temple complex – all buildings that we went did not had any air-conditioner and there is very little place you can sit under a shade. This caused us to feel very thirsty – so make sure you have plenty of water with you (we did not see any stall selling water here but I am sure there is one but is likely to be overpriced). I packed about 3 bottles of drinking water in my bag but still it was not enough. It was quite late in the afternoon when we were simply too tired (and hungry & thirsty) to go further. We walked out (not before being bugged by the beggars outside the temple – I became an easy target for them) for the nearest Metro station (it was quite a long walk from the temple to the station) and looked for a place to have lunch.

To be continued…

Enhanced by Zemanta

Trip to Oriental Paris – Part 4


(Countdown – 345 days to “doomsday”)

Read Part 1 here
Read Part 2 here
Read Part 3 here

Yes, still continuing with food post…

When one is in China and is having his food, one thing seemed certain – there is plenty of non-halal food and Chinese tea (of various grade and quality) to go around (although fast food and other foreign food seemed to be in favor at certain part of the city especially at the financial district). And there were also the highly nutritious mushrooms.

I realized now that at almost every dish we had for dinner, at least one would be mushroom dish and although we were wary of possibility of mushroom poisoning (being in China), it quickly became our must-have dish every time we have dinner.

Out of the many mushroom dishes we had, the above dish is our favorite – good enough to be eaten on its own, we had once ordered 2 plates of it. The dish was really simple but what makes the huge difference is the type of mushroom they used to cook and the way they cook it – a simple frying of the mushroom with sweet sauce and the juicy broccoli. When eaten it is almost crunchy with a smoother texture added to it and it is not that oily too. I am trying to find the same dish back home but have not seen one yet.

The above baby mushrooms dish was also good for our taste but the portions of the baby mushrooms was too small for us. The other things in the dish – vegetables and tofu somehow made up for the lack of portion.

Mixed vegetables (can’t recall what else was in there) – Shanghaian style – most of the bowls served is small sized, so when the waitresses serve our food, it is often served almost overflowing as you can see above and that makes it a bit delicate when one who is used to eat with spoon & fork, is picking the food (which is often made slippery due to the corn flour) with chopsticks.

Larger chunks of mushrooms and light soy sauce – another pure mushroom dish that we had but this time for lunch (we decided to pool our lunch money and go for cooked dishes instead). Interestingly it was not that salty despite it was rather heavy with the soy sauce (maybe because we had other dishes that compensated the taste or was it the tea that we were having, I am not sure).

Having plenty of vegetables seemed to be a better idea than having meat from an unknown source or fat laden meat – it was “light” on the stomach too. I rarely take mushrooms when in Malaysia – there are not many Malaysian dishes that goes heavily with mushrooms. The only time I encountered mushrooms (often button mushrooms) these days is when we go for Chinese food for dinner (or when one cooks soup at home).

To be continued…

Enhanced by Zemanta